USA: F-35C Test Plane Exceeding Goals

first_img View post tag: Plane View post tag: test May 18, 2011 Equipment & technology View post tag: F-35C View post tag: News by topic View post tag: usa View post tag: Exceeding View post tag: Naval Naval Air Systems Command announced May 17 that the test aircraft for the carrier variant of the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter have exceeded tes…(defense-aerospace)[mappress]Source: defense-aerospace, May 18, 2011; View post tag: Navy USA: F-35C Test Plane Exceeding Goals Back to overview,Home naval-today USA: F-35C Test Plane Exceeding Goals View post tag: goals Share this articlelast_img read more

USCGC Paul Clark Hosts Search and Rescue Training

first_img View post tag: Training View post tag: SAR View post tag: Navy June 22, 2015 View post tag: News by topic Authorities View post tag: rescue View post tag: Navalcenter_img View post tag: search Back to overview,Home naval-today USCGC Paul Clark Hosts Search and Rescue Training USCGC Paul Clark Hosts Search and Rescue Training The crew of U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Paul Clark (WPC 1106) hosted search and rescue (SAR) training to representatives from six countries in the Caribbean Sea.The Jamaican Defense Force – Coast Guard, Belize Coast Guard, Royal Canadian Navy, British Royal Navy, Mexican Navy and U.S. Navy were all on hand for the extensive, day-long training.The afternoon was given over to hands-on drills where the students were put on small boats and sent out to sea. The drills simulated real-world fire and flooding situations and required the students to put their classroom training to practical use.It was an exhausting day at sea for all the students but the relationship building experience here during the maritime phase of Tradewinds 2015 has already made an impact.Tradewinds is a combined, joint U.S. Southern Command-sponsored exercise and an opportunity for the participating partner nations to come together to enhance regional maritime security.Image: USCG Share this article View post tag: USCGC Paul Clarklast_img read more

Crossing continents with Facebook’s help

first_imgI came across a “German Newspaper Front Pages” application on Facebook. I thought it went well with this blog. Its description tells us:This application shows a random front page of one of today’s German newspapers. Slight problem: I added it, and the page it shows on my profile reads “‘Great Communicator’ dies” – the headline after Ronald Reagan’s death in, erm, The Sun in the USA. Mistake, surely?Add the application here.Cherwell24 is not responsible for the content of external siteslast_img read more

Bodleian renovation continues

first_imgThe extensive demolition of a large part of the new Bodleian Library was revealed earlier this week as scaffolding came down from the Broad Street building site. The building has been undergoing reconstruction over the past two years. This new development gives an indication of the change that is taking place in the architecture of central Oxford.The New Bodleian, constructed in the 1930’s to house a vast and varied collection of literature and manuscripts, was designed to be a fortress and was further reinforced during the bombardment of the Second World War. While the original building adhered to the traditional Oxford quad design, the new build, dubbed the Weston Project, hopes to open up this central space and make it more publicly accessible. The glass fronted building will face out onto Broad Street and the Old Bodleian library. The project is on schedule, working towards an opening for students in Autumn 2014 with an official opening in Spring 2015. It has cost more than £80 million, coming from a wide variety of sources. Whilst the architect acknowledged that “the existing building is in one of the most historically sensitive parts of the city” it appeared that there was need for development. New reading rooms, research facilities and exhibition space will be added. With regards to the destruction of the building, Suzanne de la Rosa, a spokesperson for the Bodleian Libraries, said,  “in order for us to have the calibre of building and the sort of spaces that were needed for users, staff and collections the interior of the building did need to be revamped. We feel the end result will be a good mix of the old and the new.”She added that refurbishment of the New Bodleian building is part of a larger scheme to revitalize Oxford’s historic Broad Street by creating a new public square.De la Rosa added, “The building did not meet current British standards in terms of fire protection and conservation and that needed to be addressed. But that is not the sole reason for the redevelopment. This was the impetus to get us thinking about the kind of libraries that our users and Oxford needed and that was appropriate for our collections.” The new Library will eventually store a large proportion of the treasures of the Bodleian, including both Shakespeare’s first folio and the remaining original Magna Cartas, alongside thousands of other precious literary artefacts. The development is not received enthusiastically by all students. Abdul-Rahman Jama, a third year student at Balliol College, stated, “I could not possibly care less what is happThe extensive demolition of a large part of the new Bodleian Library was revealed earlier this week as scaffolding came down from the Broad Street building site. The building has been undergoing reconstruction over the past two years. This new development gives an indication of the change that is taking place in the architecture of central Oxford.The New Bodleian, constructed in the 1930’s to house a vast and varied collection of literature and manuscripts, was designed to be a fortress and was further reinforced during the bombardment of the Second World War.While the original building adhered to the traditional Oxford quad design, the new build, dubbed the Weston Project, hopes to open up this central space and make it more publicly accessible. The glass fronted building will face out onto Broad Street and the Old Bodleian library. The project is on schedule, working towards an opening for students in Autumn 2014 with an official opening in Spring 2015. It has cost more than £80 million, coming from a wide variety of sources.Whilst the architect acknowledged that “the existing building is in one of the most historically sensitive parts of the city” it appeared that there was need for development. New reading rooms, research facilities and exhibition space will be added. With regards to the destruction of the building, Suzanne de la Rosa, a spokesperson for the Bodleian Libraries, said,  “in order for us to have the calibre of building and the sort of spaces that were needed for users, staff and collections the interior of the building did need to be revamped. We feel the end result will be a good mix of the old and the new.”She added that refurbishment of the New Bodleian building is part of a larger scheme to revitalize Oxford’s historic Broad Street by creating a new public square.De la Rosa added, “The building did not meet current British standards in terms of fire protection and conservation and that needed to be addressed. But that is not the sole reason for the redevelopment. This was the impetus to get us thinking about the kind of libraries that our users and Oxford needed and that was appropriate for our collections.” The new Library will eventually store a large proportion of the treasures of the Bodleian, including both Shakespeare’s first folio and the remaining original Magna Cartas, alongside thousands of other precious literary artefacts. The development is not received enthusiastically by all students. Abdul-Rahman Jama, a third year student at Balliol College, stated, “I could not possibly care less what is happlast_img read more

Commentary: Trump, The Courts, The Constitution, Tomcats And Marriage Licenses

first_imgCommentary: Trump, The Courts, The Constitution, Tomcats And Marriage LicensesNovember 23, 2018  By John KrullTheStatehouseFile.com INDIANAPOLIS – In the summer of 2016, while the presidential campaign raged, I ran into a lawyer with impeccable Republican and conservative credentials at the Statehouse.We stopped to chat and the conversation, naturally, ran to politics.At one point, he shook his head and said he couldn’t support Donald Trump.John Krull, publisher, TheStatehouseFile.com“For now, I’m just a Hoosier Republican. I can get behind the candidates here in Indiana, but not nationally,” he said.The breaking point, he explained, came when Trump attacked a federal judge, Gonzalo Curiel, who had the misfortune to draw a class-action lawsuit involving students who claimed to have been defrauded by Trump University.Trump claimed the judge couldn’t be impartial because he was “Mexican.” In fact, Curiel was born and educated here in Indiana.The facts, though, didn’t deter then-candidate Trump.“I have a judge who is a hater of Donald Trump, a hater. He’s a hater,” Trump said of Curiel in a speech.That speech appalled the conservative Hoosier lawyer.“When Trump attacked the judge, that was too much for me,” the lawyer said. “If you support the courts and the rule of law, you can’t stand for that.”Trump eventually settled the suit before Curiel’s court by agreeing to pay the aggrieved Trump University $25 million.I’ve thought of that conversation often in the past two years – generally when President Donald Trump has launched another attack on the courts or a judge.Those attacks have come often, because the courts have had frequent cause to curb the Trump administration’s assaults on liberty, due process and other enshrined American principles.This hasn’t happened because judges and courts “hate” Donald Trump.No, the president’s troubles with the judicial branch have occurred because, to use a great line uttered about a president from a much earlier era, Donald Trump “has about as much use for the Constitution as a tomcat has for a marriage license.”I’ve known a lot of judges in my career.The overwhelming majority take their jobs and their roles seriously. They could make a lot more money in private practice. They take their seats on the bench as an act of faith – an expression of their belief in the law and the law’s majesty.That said, they’re also human beings.They don’t enjoy being a blowhard’s political punching bag any more than the next person does.I’ve wondered since that talk with the lawyer when the judges were going to start pushing back against the president – and how they would do it.The moment came during Thanksgiving week.A federal district judge in San Francisco blocked the Trump administration from denying asylum to immigrants who cross the border illegally.“This was an Obama judge,” the president lashed out at Judge Jon S. Tigar. “And I tell you what, it’s not going to happen like this anymore.”That was too much for U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts.“We do not have Obama judges or Trump judges, Bush judges or Clinton judges,” Roberts countered in a statement. “What we have is an extraordinary group of dedicated judges doing their level best to do equal right to those appearing before them.”The chief justice’s public rebuke of the president was in many ways unprecedented.But, then, Trump’s conduct in office has been unprecedented.His attempts to undermine and defy the authority of the courts and the law have been more sweeping than anything Richard Nixon or Andrew Jackson – two presidents who also had strong authoritarian predispositions – ever contemplated. Time and again, this president has asserted that he is answerable to no one but himself and that he is above the law.Roberts’ rebuke was a long time coming but justified.It also had been predicted – sort of.Earlier this year, Judge Curiel ruled in favor of the president and rejected a challenge to Trump’s plan to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexican border.In his decision, Curiel noted the great political controversy aroused by the proposed wall and cited the legal reasoning of a “fellow Indiana native” who also was a judge.That fellow Indiana native?Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts, who was born in Elkhart.Hoosier lawyers – you’ve got to love them.FOOTNOTE:  John Krull is director of Franklin College’s Pulliam School of Journalism, host of “No Limits” WFYI 90.1 Indianapolis and publisher of TheStatehouseFile.com, a news website powered by Franklin College journalism students.The City-County Observer post this article without opinion, bias or editing.Print Friendly, PDF & EmailFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

Provocative, Cutting Edge and Topical: Voices Features International Dance & Theater…

first_img ×Voices: International Theater Festival showcases two international productions in September: Watch Now (left), a Slovakian Dance performance and The Truth, an avant-garde theater production. Jersey City Theater Center (JCTC) presents two international companies, from Slovakia and Poland, when Voices: International Theater Festival returns to Merseles Studios.The upcoming shows are Watch Now (Thursday/Sept. 26) and The Truth (Friday/Sept. 27) at Merseles Studios, 339 Newark Avenue, Jersey City. The shows are free of charge, but seating is limited and audiences are encouraged to RSVP at www.JCTCenter.orgThe first annual Voices: International Theater Festival—believed to be the first international theater festival in the state of New Jersey – is a series both global and eclectic – not only have the performers toured internationally, but the festival features a wide array of performances, including music, dance, and a range of theatrical productions.Watch Now and The Truth are cutting edge productions, in part selected because that in keeping with JCTC’s programming, grapple with issues literally global in scope, yet relevant to individuals in any community.Watch Now – an avant-garde dance performance accompanied by live music – explores issues of identity, privacy and loneliness in our contemporary, high-tech global society as the narrative follows a couple  undergoing a difficult time in their relationship. It is never clear whether their movements are affectionate or manipulative, as they both gently touch then refuse contact. (September 26)The Truth – is an  internationally acclaimed production by Studium Teatralne, one of Poland’s leading theatre-makers – explores the dichotomies of the secular and sacred in contemporary life, combing such diverse texts as the Gospels and Dostoyevsky’s “Brothers Karamazov,” The Truth asks us to consider the question, if life is devoid of any mystery or purpose, where do you find meaning? English subtitles accompany this Polish Language production. (September 27).“Watch Now and The Truth are edgy and engaging theatre that deals with issues relevant around the world,” said Olga Levina, Artistic Director, JCTC. “With the first annual Voices: International Theater Festival, JCTC is incorporating international programming in a more substantial way than ever before. The arts and theater scene in Jersey City is continually evolving. It is a very natural progression for a city as diverse as Jersey City to be recognized as an international cultural destination.”JCTC is presenting Watch Now and The Truth in partnership with Rehearsal for Truth, a theater festival  presented in New York City by the Vaclav Havel Library Foundation , a nonprofit organization established in the United States to honor, preserve, and build upon the legacy of playwright, dissident, and former President of Czechoslovakia and the Czech Republic, Vaclav Havel.“A commitment to social and political theater is something we have in common with JCTC,” said Pavla Niklova, Executive Director, Vaclav Havel Library Foundation. “Both of our organizations want to present theater from Eastern and Central Europe, which is very difficult to see in the New York/New Jersey area. Voices: International Theater Festival is a wonderful chance to share resources and bring this work to new audiences.”Voices: International Theater Festival began in August, with Jazz Italiano, an “Italian Jazz” concert featuring IDR_Italian Doc Remix. The series concludes with  La Caja (December 10 & 11), a multimedia, physical theater production by Los Escultores del Aire, an internationally acclaimed touring theater company based in Spain. All Voices performances are held at Merseles Studios.Admission is free, but seating is on a first-come, first-serve basis. It is highly recommended that audiences reserve sats at www.JCTCenter.org Jersey City Theater CenterMerseles Studios339 Newark AvenueJersey City, NJ 07302(201) 795-5386center_img Voices: International Theater Festival showcases two international productions in September: Watch Now (left), a Slovakian Dance performance and The Truth, an avant-garde theater production.last_img read more

Two named ACM fellows

first_imgSusan Landau, a visiting scholar in computing science at the Radcliffe Institute, and Herchel Smith Professor of Computer Science Margo Seltzer were two of 46 people who were recently named fellows by the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM). Fellows were recognized for their contributions to computing that have provided fundamental knowledge to the computing field and generated multiple technology advances in industry, commerce, health care, entertainment, and education.“These women and men, who are some of the leading thinkers and practitioners in computer science and engineering, are changing how the world lives and works,” said ACM President Alain Chesnais.For a complete list of fellows.last_img read more

Bryan Cranston Set for All the Way HBO Movie Adaptation

first_img Cranston won a Tony for his Broadway debut in All The Way. In addition to his Emmy-winning turn on Breaking Bad, his many film and TV credits include Argo, Malcolm in the Middle, Drive, The Cleveland Show, The King of Queens, Seinfeld and Little Miss Sunshine. Bryan Cranston is officially coming back to the small screen! As previously speculated, the Tony and Emmy winner will reprise his performance as President Lyndon B. Johnson in a TV movie based on All the Way. According to The Hollywood Reporter, Steven Spielberg will produce the adaptation of the Tony-winning drama for HBO. All the Way playwright and Pulitzer Prize winner Robert Schenkkan will pen the screenplay. Additional casting and expected production and air dates have yet to be announced. Star Files All the Way begins with the Kennedy assassination and details the first year of Johnson’s presidency, focusing on his involvement with the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The drama starts on Air Force One on November 23, 1963, as the plane transports the body of President Kennedy back to Washington, D.C., and Johnson summons his courage to take on the role of commander-in-chief. The play took its final Broadway bow on June 29. View Comments Bryan Cranstonlast_img read more

Australian coal-fired generator signs large solar power purchase deal

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享PV Magazine:Delta Electricity has contracted a total of 150 MW of solar power from the 275MW AC/332MW DC Darlington Solar Farm, which will be one of Australia’s largest solar PV projects once completed. The power purchase agreement has been inked with the project developer, Edify Energy, which expects to reach financial close and commence construction shortly.The massive solar farm planned to be coupled with a big 100 MWh energy storage facility was approved by the NSW Department of Planning and Environment last week, as state bureaucrats approv[ed] nearly 500 MW of solar PV. Located near Griffith in western NSW, the Darlington Point Solar Farm will generate 685,000 MWh of renewable energy annually, enough to power approximately 130,000 homes and create up to 400 local construction jobs with commercial operation is slated for early 2020.In a joint statement, the two companies describe the PPA as an example of solar working together with coal in NSW, demonstrating the growing place of renewable energy. “Delta recognises that both dispatchable power and low emission technologies have a role to play in supporting an affordable, reliable and sustainable national electricity market,” said Delta Electricity company secretary, Steve Gurney.The companies note that the agreement ends in 2030, coinciding with both the end of the RET period as well as the current expected operating life for [the coal-fired] Vales Point Power Station.Combining the output of the solar and coal-fired power plant is not new for Delta Electricity. The company is also developing the 55 MW Vales Point solar project alongside the aging coal plant on the shores of Lake Macquarie, NSW, as one of the first large scale solar power plant in Australia to operate in conjunction with a coal-fired power station.More: Coal generator owner in Australia inks major solar PPA Australian coal-fired generator signs large solar power purchase deallast_img read more