Jolt to Kushwahas RLSP all three of its legislators join JDU

first_imgPatna: After drawing a blank in the Lok Sabha elections, former Union minister Upendra Kushwaha’s Rashtriya Lok Samata Party Sunday received yet another setback as all three of its members in the bicameral legislature joined Chief Minister Nitish Kumar’s JD(U).Confirming the development, Assembly Speaker Vijay Kumar Chaudhary and legislative council deputy chairman Haroon Rashid said letters to this effect have been forwarded by two RLSP MLAs– Lalan Paswan and Sudhanshu Shekhar– and MLC Sanjiv Singh Shyam on Friday. Also Read – Pak activated 20 terror camps & 20 launch pads along LoC”The legislators had also appended letters of approval from the JD(U). They were asked to appear in person for completion of formalities. Henceforth, they shall be treated as JD(U) legislators,” Chaudhary and Rashid said. Notably, the RLSP legislators had earlier revolted against Kushwaha’s decision to snap ties with the NDA and join the Mahagathbandhan. They announced that they would remain with the ruling coalition and seek recognition from the Election Commission as the “real Rashtriya Lok Samata Party”. The stupendous victory of the NDA in the Lok Sabha polls, wherein it won all but one of the 40 seats in the state, appears to have made the dissident RLSP legislawtors realise that it was safer to join the chief minister’s party, which contested 17 seats and bagged 16, than seeking recognition as a separate group. Also Read – Two squadrons which participated in Balakot airstrike awarded citationsKushwaha was with the JD(U) till 2013, when he resigned from the party and his Rajya Sabha membership following differences with Nitish Kumar. He went on to float his own party which aligned with the NDA and won all three seats it had contested in the 2014 Lok Sabha polls, riding the Modi wave. In the just-concluded Lok Sabha polls, the RLSP contested five seats in alliance with the RJD, the Congress and two other small outfits. The party, however, lost all five seats to its rivals, including Karakat and Ujiyarpur, from where Kushwaha himself had contested.last_img read more

Forbes Rangers remain most valuable franchise followed by Leafs Habs

TORONTO — The New York Rangers are the NHL’s most valuable franchise for a fourth consecutive year, according to the latest estimate by Forbes.The Rangers top the annual list of franchise valuations at US$1.55 billion, up three per cent over last year.The Toronto Maple Leafs are second at $1.35 billion and Montreal Canadiens third at $1.3 billion, a four-per-cent increase for both clubs.Original Six clubs make up the top five of the list, with the Chicago Blackhawks fourth at $1.05 billion and the Boston Bruins fifth at $925 million. The Detroit Red Wings are not far behind their Original Six cousins in eighth ($775 million) and have seen an 11-per-cent increase in value thanks to a new downtown arena.Los Angeles (sixth, $810 million), Philadelphia (seventh, $800 million), Vancouver (ninth, $735 million) and Washington (10th, $725 million) round out the top 10. The Capitals enjoyed a league-best 16-per-cent boost in valuation over last year thanks to a run to its first ever Stanley Cup title.The Vegas Golden Knights had a 15-per-cent boost in value to $575 million, good for 12th in the league, after becoming the first expansion team to advance to the Cup final.At the other end of the list are the Florida Panthers (30th, $295 million) and Arizona Coyotes (31st, $290 million). The clubs were the only two to lose value according to Forbes, down three per cent each.The Canadian teams are rounded out by Edmonton (13th, $540 million), Calgary (20th, $450 million), Ottawa (23rd, $435 million) and Winnipeg (27th, $415 million). The Jets’ value jumped 11 per cent thanks to the team’s run to the Western Conference final.According to the list, the value of the average NHL team rose six per cent during the past year, to a record $630 million.The release of the list comes on the heels of the NHL approving a 32nd team in Seattle for a hefty expansion fee of $650 million.The Canadian Press read more