Tennessee tracking police deaths, killings

first_imgIn this special podcast episode of “Harvard Chan: This Week in Health,” the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health examines how the state of Tennessee is taking action to more accurately track police deaths and police killings — and explore how that could lead to changes in how police forces operate.“We are starting with the basic principle that first you need to know what the patterns are and then you start doing the kinds of research to try to understand why,” Nancy Krieger, professor of social epidemiology at the Chan School of Public Health, told Voice of America in a July 13 article. Krieger led a study that resulted in a report published this past year.Tracking police killings and police deathslast_img read more

PSG’s Al-Khelaifi in firing line as French clubs battle for TV revenue

first_imgRead Also: PSG launch crowdfunding initiative against COVID-19“This is a very important period. The club’s future is not at stake, but our room for manoeuvre in the future is,” said one club source, and they could certainly do with the broadcast money.Meanwhile, Roures insists his company will survive the impact of the current crisis, although it does not even yet have a channel set up to show games.“I am not saying there is no impact, but we always respect our contracts,” he told L’Equipe.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Promoted ContentCouples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable Way6 Interesting Ways To Make Money With A Drone10 Characters Who Would Make Astounding Disney PrincessesTop 7 Best Car Manufacturers Of All Time7 Universities Where Getting An Education Costs A Hefty Penny7 Ways To Understand Your Girlfriend BetterDid You Know There’s A Black Hole In The Milky Way?7 Universities In The World Where Education Costs Too Much7 Universities In The World With The Highest Market Value10 Risky Jobs Some Women DoWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?20 Facts That’ll Change Your Perception Of “The Big Bang Theory” Viewers wishing to watch beIN Sports will need a Canal Plus subscription. Roures called it a “strategic alliance” between the two companies. – Crisis very real – The crisis is very real for the clubs, who are left wondering what will happen if the season does not resume. Payments from television amounted to 36 percent of total revenue for Ligue 1 teams last season, by far their biggest source of income. However, leading voices at other clubs have dismissed fears of a conflict of interest in the case of Al-Khelaifi. “Nasser did not put himself forward. We asked him. We need to be clear,” said Lille president Gerard Lopez. Al-Khelaifi’s own club also risk taking by far the biggest hit if no more games are played — L’Equipe claimed PSG could lose 215 million euros between the loss of projected gate receipts and Champions League revenues. PSG are the fifth richest club in the world going by the latest Deloitte Football Money League with revenue of 635.9 million euros last year, but their annual wage bill is an estimated 337 million euros. Loading… Paris Saint-Germain president Nasser al-Khelaifi has been accused of becoming embroiled in a conflict of interest in a dispute over television payments to French football clubs facing a financial crisis in the coronavirus pandemic.Al-Khelaifi, 46, is the public face of the Qatari ownership of PSG which has transformed them into one of Europe’s most powerful clubs.Paris Saint-Germain’s Qatari president Nasser Al-Khelaifi at a press conferenceHe is also the head of BeIN Media Group, who as one of the chief broadcasters of France’s Ligue 1 have withheld the latest payment due to clubs because of the ongoing suspension of the season. Canal Plus, who pay the most for broadcast rights, have done the same. Despite that, Al-Khelaifi has been mandated by the French league (LFP) along with three other club presidents to lead negotiations with Canal Plus in an attempt to convince them to pay up. The president of the company who have bought the rights to show Ligue 1 games from next season blasted Al-Khelaifi in an interview published on Thursday. “I don’t understand how Nasser can be leading a negotiation when he is an interested party,” Jaume Roures of the Spanish group Mediapro told sports daily L’Equipe. “It is incomprehensible. The attitude of Canal Plus and beIN towards the league is also Nasser’s attitude. He is not a third party who has come out of nowhere.” BeIN held back paying an instalment of 42 million euros to the LFP for the rights to broadcast games. That was after Canal Plus said they would not pay 110 million euros ($121 million) due this month. The money due from Canal Plus represents 15 percent of the total broadcast money for the season in Ligue 1, and includes 43 million euros due for matches shown before the campaign was suspended on March 13. Mediapro, which is Chinese-owned, bought up the bulk of the domestic rights to Ligue 1 for four years starting next season. The total deal is worth a record 1.15 billion euros a year, with beIN paying a minority of that amount.last_img read more

What the Heck is This Thing That Washed Up in Hobe Sound?

first_imgA massive, mysterious, bright yellow object with lots of wires and strange gadgets attached to it washed up on Hobe Sound beach Monday morning.Locals are buzzing about the beached doodad/doohickey because no one seems to know what it is.Ken Mears and Mike Gomes took pictures of the object that washed ashore on the north end of Jupiter island.The object has a large, round yellow top with a long metal arm coming out of it.The underside is loaded with metal rods, wires, and chains, and there appears to be a tank attached to the bottom as well.Officials are still trying to figure out what this object is and how they will remove it.last_img read more

Training a Thoroughbred for Monmouth Park

first_imgArt Petrosemolo will follow Rainbow At Midnite when she returns to Monmouth Park in April and will be at the rail when she goes to the starting gate for her first race. By Art PetrosemoloVeteran New Jersey thoroughbred trainer John Mazza and owner Rosemarie Shockley are getting close to an answer for their $64,000 question.Exercise rider heading to the track for early morning workout at Gulfstream Park, Hallandale, Fla.After two years of careful handling, good food, vitamins, visits to the vet, romping in the paddock and Florida training, Mazza and Shockley soon will know if their group of Holly Crest thoroughbreds have what it takes to succeed in the sport of kings.Two-year-old gray filly Rainbow At Midnite and her six stablemates will relocate from Florida’s Circle S ranch to Monmouth Park soon for final race-ready preparations before their first start. Midnite’s sister Holy Rainbow, a three-year-old, has run well at Florida’s Gulfstream Park with two solid third-place finishes. It has pleased Mazza and Shockley and has given them hope for Midnite.Mazza, who has trained Vincent Annaralla’s horses at Holly Crest Farm in Locust, for years, says, “training is not an exact science. Everyone goes about it a little different. But with correct breeding, proper handling and good training, you could – if the horse has a competitive spirit – have a fast and successful thoroughbred.”Translated, fast and successful means capable of succeeding in allowance and even stakes races and not missing a paycheck! “If the horse just doesn’t have the speed or the heart to be a winner,” continues Mazza, “then you hope the genes are good so that he or she might pass it along to offspring.”Two year olds enjoy the Florida sun in the Circle S paddock.Thoroughbred training is a long and expensive process. Horses are foaled in the winter (hopefully January to March) and grow under the watchful eye of the broodmare and the farm staff. Food, care and surroundings all contribute to early growth as horses stay with their mothers for most of their first year. (Every thoroughbred ages one year on Jan. 1.)During its second year, the thoroughbred, now called a yearling, continues to grow and mature with other yearlings spending the warm months in grassy paddocks. As they turn two, trainers and owners decide when and if the yearling will be broke and readied for the track. There are special trainers and farms in the southern United States that specialize in getting these feisty fillies and colts to mature before the final exam at a racetrack a few months away.Third generation trainer Tim Kelly is preparing the Holly Crest hopefuls for racing this year at Circle S Ranch in Florida horse country about a half-hour from Gulf­stream Park. Kelly says when the two year olds arrive at the farm – usually in December – they spend the first month getting used to people and being touched and handled. “We brush them, talk to them, clean their feet and bathe them daily,” he says. “These horses have spent the first two years of their lives growing and playing with minimum human contact.”A pair of Holly Crest Farm two year olds work out on the soft track at Circle S Ranch.Kelly then begins to get each thoroughbred comfortable with the racing equipment including saddle cloth, saddle and bridle. “This is the first time these animals have had anything in their mouths,” he says, “and it isn’t natural.”It could be as long as eight weeks in the training program before a thoroughbred feels the weight of an exercise rider on its back and it doesn’t like it. Says Kelly, “Anything on a horse’s back is a predator and the horse will try to buck him off in self defense.” The phrase “breaking horses” comes from getting the horse to break the habit of resisting being ridden.The maturing but still feisty two year olds train six days a week and start by learning to walk, jog and gallop in a round pen, attached to a tether and then under the hands of the exercise rider. The thoroughbred then learns how to respond to the rider’s steering through the bridle by walking and jogging in figure eights and other patterns in a larger pen.But it isn’t all work, all day, says Mazza; two year olds spend the afternoons enjoying Florida weather grazing in large, shaded paddocks.Holy Rainbow in her morning workout at Gulfstream Park.Once the two year old is schooled, Kelly moves them to the training track. At Circle S, the oval is one-half mile with a starting chute and starting gate. “The surface is deep and soft,” says Mazza, “which allows the horses to develop bone and muscle.” The two year olds train un-shoed until their feet reach adult size in early spring and they may only have their front feet shoed to start.Horses work in groups. At Circle S, they are trained in pairs. “We have horses gallop in front of each other so the trailing horse gets used to sand in its face,” Kelly explains. They also gallop beside each other so they get used to running in close quarters and they change positions during each session, each day.Rainbow At Midnite gallops on the soft surface at Circle S Ranch getting ready for her debut at Monmouth Park later this spring.Mazza and Shockley make the trip to Circle S each week to watch the two year olds and confer with Kelly on their training. Mazza can tell when a “baby” (as he calls them) is progressing as expected. “You can tell the way they walk, jog, gallop and carry themselves,” he says.It’s all about bringing a horse along at the right pace, Mazza feels. “I am old school,” he smiles, “and I take the extra time to get the two year old ready. I only have one chance with each horse to do it right and I don’t want to rush it.” Mazza wants to see a two year old come back from a mile gallop unwinded and ready for more. When Holly Crest horses arrive at Monmouth Park in April, Mazza says he continues to bring them along slowly until he is sure they are ready for their first race.Trainer John Mazza watches a pair of Holly Crest two year olds exercise on the Circle S training track.Two year olds are not timed while in the breaking process. Trainers won’t have any idea of what speed these horses have and whether they might be better for short or long races until they “breeze” (gallop) 5/8 of a mile later this spring at their home track. It’s then that trainers will begin to get the answer to the $64K question on whether these young thoroughbreds have what it takes. The first final exam – a maiden race against other two year olds for a purse – comes soon after. And only then will Mazza and Shockley get their first real answer to whether they have a winner.last_img read more

Red Bank ‘Soupmeister’ Says Goodbye After 25 Years

first_imgRED BANK – Though specialty soup recipes are his passion, it’s the relationships Gary Sable will miss most when he hangs up his ladle and moves out of the narrow quarters he’s called home for the last 25 years. Sable said chicken pot pie has been his signature menu item. It was a painstaking process to crack the code and figure out the best way to make it. A resident of Keansburg, Sable plans to practice his craft from time to time at the soup kitchen at the Center for Community Renewal, next to St. Mark’s Episcopal Church, 247 Carr Ave., Keansburg. “But I say that with affection,” he added. “That’s the one people love most. And I came up with it the same way I did everything else. All of these soups come from experimentation at home on the family for Sunday dinner,” Sable said. “If they didn’t spit it out and everything turned out OK, then I’d bring it down here.” “Steve is a great guy who has been a customer from the very beginning,” Sable said. “He’s been in here working with me every morning for some time now, learning my recipes. I trust him with this. And I already told my wife I’m gonna be back here visiting. I’m gonna miss the customers. I’ve known so many of them for so long.” In his final week of operation, Sable said he rolled out his “greatest hits,” including chicken escarole, Italian wedding, chicken tortilla and the option he said helped cement his moniker, chicken pot pie soup. Over the years, if you strolled too briskly through the borough alleyway that connects the White Street parking lot to Monmouth Street, you could have easily missed the chalkboard listing of the day’s offerings at That Hot Dog Place. Customer Stan Montenaro, exiting the store recently with a cup of spicy sausage soup, described the 175-square-foot kitchen as a “claustrophobic hole-in-the-wall with a stove and a counter.” As they wait their turn in line for soup, sandwiches and hot dogs with sauerkraut, the lunch crowd banter is about new soup ideas, recently released rock n’ roll movies “Bohemian Rhapsody” and “Rocket Man,” and Sable’s two favorite teams, the New York Jets and New York Yankees. It’s more than chitchat, it’s a relationship developed over years and the thought of cutting these ties brought a tear to Sable’s eye.center_img Known as the “Soupmeister,” Sable has operated a Red Bank eatery named That Hot Dog Place since 1995, but recently sold the business to borough resident Steve DeAngelo. DeAngelo officially took the reins of the business Aug. 29 and will operate under a new name, Soul Sandwich. But Sable said most of the menu will remain intact. After pondering the recipe for weeks, Sable said he was losing sleep over how to perfect the crust. “You can’t have chicken pot pie without a good crust. How the hell am I gonna get a good crust on this soup?” Sable said. “So my wife, who doesn’t cook ver y much, she says, ‘Why don’t you make the crust on the side and serve it in a cup.’ Perfect! It’s like why didn’t you tell me this sooner? She goes, ‘You never asked me.’ That idea really helped make this place,” Sable said. “My wife is wondering why I want to come back and visit once or twice a month. And it’s because I’ve known some of these people for 25 years and honestly it’s going to be hard not to see them. That’s the toughest part of this whole situation,” Sable said. “When I think about it, there’s not one person who comes here that I don’t like. Before this, when I owned a bar, there were a hundred people I didn’t like. But here, not one.” When the shop officially rebrands as Soul Sandwich, Sable said he plans to retain his reputation as a maestro of the culinary mélange, but for a new clientele. But what has truly helped That Hot Dog Place sustain its clientele is the engaging personality of the Soupmeister himself. “Making soup is my passion and if I can use that to help out some of my community members then I’m happy to do it,” Sable said. “Besides that, I’ll have a full schedule of picking up my grandson from school and watching after him.”last_img read more