Pets of the Week at the Pasadena Humane Society

first_imgEVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Community News Phillip (A410117) is a 2-year-old, male, black Chihuahua with a lot of energy. Phillip’s favorite thing is going for walks. The second he’s leashed up and out the kennel door, his tail starts wagging as he sniffs and explores his way around. This curious boy loves treats, and he’s more than happy to stand on his hind legs to earn one! When he’s not busy making the world his oyster, Phillip looks for the comfort of a lap, where he’ll happily sit for petting.The adoption fee for dogs is $125 and includes the spay or neuter surgery, microchip, and vaccinations.New adopters will receive a complimentary health-and-wellness exam from VCA Animal Hospitals, as well as a goody bag filled with information about how to care for your pet.Call the Pasadena Humane Society & SPCA at (626) 792-7151 to ask about A410117, or visit at 361 S. Raymond Ave. in Pasadena. Adoption hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Friday; and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday.Pets may not be available for adoption and cannot be held for potential adopters by phone calls or email. Directions and photos of all pets can be found at pasadenahumane.org. Bruce (A410199) is a 2-year-old, male, black rabbit. This snuggly fellow always has one ear up, one ear down – all the better to hear you with! Bruce enjoys ear rubs and absolutely adores being held. He’ll even calmly snuggle up on your lap for a quick snooze once he gets comfortable with you. Bruce also enjoys bouncing around our bunny enrichment kennel, hopping up and down our stairs and pushing toys around with his nose. When he’s not busy being the life of our Critter House, Bruce enjoys munching on mixed green salads.The adoption fee for rabbits is $30 and includes the spay or neuter surgery and a microchip.New adopters will receive a complimentary health-and-wellness exam from VCA Animal Hospitals, as well as a goody bag filled with information about how to care for your pet.Call the Pasadena Humane Society & SPCA at (626) 792-7151 to ask about A410199, or visit at 361 S. Raymond Ave. in Pasadena. Adoption hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Friday; and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday.Pets may not be available for adoption and cannot be held for potential adopters by phone calls or email. Directions and photos of all pets can be found at pasadenahumane.org. Community News Pets of the Week at the Pasadena Humane Society From STAFF REPORTS Published on Tuesday, December 20, 2016 | 12:00 pm First Heatwave Expected Next Week Subscribe Top of the News faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Donald CommunityPCC- COMMUNITYVirtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPasadena Public WorksPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Here are the Pets of the Week available for adoption at the Pasadena Humane Society this week: HerbeautyNutritional Strategies To Ease AnxietyHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyInstall These Measures To Keep Your Household Safe From Covid19HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThe Most Heartwarming Moments Between Father And DaughterHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyNow She’s 19 – Look At Her Transformation! Incredible!HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyShort On Time? 10-Minute Workouts Are Just What You NeedHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyGained Back All The Weight You Lost?HerbeautyHerbeautycenter_img Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Community News Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  More Cool Stuff 15 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Business News Make a comment Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadenalast_img read more

LI Reps Split On EPA’s Efforts To Curb Carbon Emissions & Combat Climate Change

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York While the nations of the world heard President Obama take the pledge in Paris this week that the United States would do more to combat climate change, the House of Representatives passed two measures apparently aimed at undercutting him.Here on Long Island, which is especially vulnerable to rising sea levels from global warming, the votes are split along party lines on these resolutions, which would weaken the Environmental Protection Agency’s efforts to reduce carbon emissions from existing and future coal-fired power plants.Freshman Republican Congressman Lee Zeldin (R-Shirley) says he supported the two joint resolutions—already approved by the Republican-controlled Senate—because the EPA’s so-called “Clean Power Rule” could significantly raise electricity bills on Long Island.“Some forecasts see potential costs as high as $366 billion to $479 billion over the period 2017-2031,” he told the Press in an email. “While I support clean and renewable energy on Long Island, I am opposed to unfunded EPA mandates that ignore the role of Congress and the Constitution. Any deal negotiated in Paris must be presented to the Senate in the manner proscribed by the U.S. Constitution. The President has no authorization from Congress to commit any U.S. taxpayer money to other nations or to agree to any unconstitutional regulations that would infringe on our nation’s sovereignty.”As a longtime elected official from eastern Suffolk, Zeldin says he’s always been a staunch supporter of clean energy and protecting Long Island’s environment. But he found fault with the Obama administration on this important issue.“While protecting the environment is one of my priorities, hearing our president compare the threat of climate change to that of ISIS, or hearing Secretary of State John Kerry call climate change ‘the world’s most fearsome weapon of mass destruction,’ shows how completely out of touch this administration is on foreign policy, especially in light of the recent terror attacks in Paris.”Also serving her first term in Congress, Rep. Kathleen Rice (D-Garden City) vehemently disagreed. She saw the resolutions as the latest attempts to prevent the EPA from doing its job, as well as undermining President Obama as he pursues an international climate treaty in Paris. And, just as clearly, she agreed with the Secretary of State’s assessment of the issue.“Climate change is not only a threat to the environment and public health–it’s a threat to our national security,” said Rice in an email. “It’s a threat to our energy grid and to our troops on the ground all over the world who are forced to spend massive amounts of time transporting, retrieving, storing and protecting fossil fuels. While politicians and special interests debate whether or not climate change is real, our military leaders are taking action and leading the effort to diversify our energy grid, develop alternative energy sources, and reduce fossil fuel dependency.”An aerial view of the City of Long Beach after Superstorm Sandy. (Kevin Kane/Long Island Press)She outlined the perils of doing nothing to reduce heat-trapping carbon in the atmosphere, one of the leading causes of global warming, because “those of us on Long Island have a tremendous amount to lose as sea levels will continue to rise and extreme weather events like Superstorm Sandy will become more frequent and more intense.”Rice stressed the importance of investing in renewable energy sources such as wind and solar power to create good jobs and economic opportunities here. “We have to capitalize on our potential to be a leader in the transition to a cleaner, greener economy,” she said.Rice’s assessment that climate change is a national security issue echoes a 2014 report published by a military advisory board consisting of retired generals and other military officials, including former Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta. “During our decades of experience in the U.S. military, we have addressed many national security challenges, from containment and deterrence of the Soviet nuclear threat during the Cold War to political extremism and transnational terrorism in recent years,” the panel wrote in the report titled “National Security and the Accelerating Risks of Climate Change.” “The national security risks of projected climate change are as serious as any challenges we have faced.”Long Island’s longest-serving congressman, Rep. Peter King (R-Seaford), never responded to explain his votes or his views on climate change, despite repeated attempts to reach him, as of press time. Long Island’s senior Democratic Congressman, Rep. Steve Israel (D-Dix Hills) agreed with his party’s colleague from Nassau.“We have a moral responsibility to take action to protect families and communities from the negative impacts of climate damage,” said Rep. Israel in an email. “These dangerous Republican resolutions prevent our country from taking practical steps to curb carbon pollution and keep the air we breathe clean. We all know the effects that dirtier air and water will have on future generations and coastal communities like Long Island.”Adding urgency to the climate change debate is the potential devastation to our region, considering that a large section of New York City and the South Shore of Long Island lies less than 10 feet above sea level now, and that puts hundreds of thousands of people at risk during major storm events, whether from excessive rainfall or hurricanes. Based on some current projections, the average sea level could rise 8 inches by 2020 and by almost two feet by 2050.Environmentalists railed against the House votes, calling “these attempted giveaways for industry…extreme legislation that no New York member of Congress can justify supporting” because it would block climate action and clean air protections, according to Peter Iwanowicz, executive director of watchdog group Environmental Advocates of New York.By supporting the bills, Iwanowicz said in an email, Reps. Zeldin and King “are placing the interests of western polluters over our public health here at home.”While world leaders are convening in Paris “to plan global climate action,” Iwanowicz added, the goal of the House of Representatives is “to thwart progress.”“Climate change has taken an enormous human and economic toll that is only expected to get worse in the years ahead,” he said. “New York is already ahead of schedule on meeting standards required under the Clean Power Plan thanks to the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI). There is no justification for any New York member of Congress to support this effort.”last_img read more

Home invasion suspect drives himself to jail in stolen jeep

first_imgPort St. Lucie Police DepartmentPolice say James Simpson drove himself to jail in this Jeep Wrangler that was stolen during a home invasion in Port St. Lucie. A Port St. Lucie man who is accused of attacking and robbing an 80-year-old man in a home invasion drove himself to jail in the victim’s stolen jeep.On Wednesday, police released surveillance photographs of the suspect on social media.Police arrested 40-year-0ld James Simpson on Thursday when he decided to drive himself to the jail in the vehicle he told after seeing himself on the news and social media.Simpson attacked the elderly man in his home and stole his credit cards, and the victim’s Jeep Wrangler.Port St. Lucie police Sgt. Lisa Marie Carrasquillo said a neighbor found the victim lying on the floor of his home Tuesday and called 911.Simpson is facing multiple charges, including attempted murder, aggravated battery on a person 65 or older and home-invasion robberylast_img read more