Bodleian renovation continues

first_imgThe extensive demolition of a large part of the new Bodleian Library was revealed earlier this week as scaffolding came down from the Broad Street building site. The building has been undergoing reconstruction over the past two years. This new development gives an indication of the change that is taking place in the architecture of central Oxford.The New Bodleian, constructed in the 1930’s to house a vast and varied collection of literature and manuscripts, was designed to be a fortress and was further reinforced during the bombardment of the Second World War. While the original building adhered to the traditional Oxford quad design, the new build, dubbed the Weston Project, hopes to open up this central space and make it more publicly accessible. The glass fronted building will face out onto Broad Street and the Old Bodleian library. The project is on schedule, working towards an opening for students in Autumn 2014 with an official opening in Spring 2015. It has cost more than £80 million, coming from a wide variety of sources. Whilst the architect acknowledged that “the existing building is in one of the most historically sensitive parts of the city” it appeared that there was need for development. New reading rooms, research facilities and exhibition space will be added. With regards to the destruction of the building, Suzanne de la Rosa, a spokesperson for the Bodleian Libraries, said,  “in order for us to have the calibre of building and the sort of spaces that were needed for users, staff and collections the interior of the building did need to be revamped. We feel the end result will be a good mix of the old and the new.”She added that refurbishment of the New Bodleian building is part of a larger scheme to revitalize Oxford’s historic Broad Street by creating a new public square.De la Rosa added, “The building did not meet current British standards in terms of fire protection and conservation and that needed to be addressed. But that is not the sole reason for the redevelopment. This was the impetus to get us thinking about the kind of libraries that our users and Oxford needed and that was appropriate for our collections.” The new Library will eventually store a large proportion of the treasures of the Bodleian, including both Shakespeare’s first folio and the remaining original Magna Cartas, alongside thousands of other precious literary artefacts. The development is not received enthusiastically by all students. Abdul-Rahman Jama, a third year student at Balliol College, stated, “I could not possibly care less what is happThe extensive demolition of a large part of the new Bodleian Library was revealed earlier this week as scaffolding came down from the Broad Street building site. The building has been undergoing reconstruction over the past two years. This new development gives an indication of the change that is taking place in the architecture of central Oxford.The New Bodleian, constructed in the 1930’s to house a vast and varied collection of literature and manuscripts, was designed to be a fortress and was further reinforced during the bombardment of the Second World War.While the original building adhered to the traditional Oxford quad design, the new build, dubbed the Weston Project, hopes to open up this central space and make it more publicly accessible. The glass fronted building will face out onto Broad Street and the Old Bodleian library. The project is on schedule, working towards an opening for students in Autumn 2014 with an official opening in Spring 2015. It has cost more than £80 million, coming from a wide variety of sources.Whilst the architect acknowledged that “the existing building is in one of the most historically sensitive parts of the city” it appeared that there was need for development. New reading rooms, research facilities and exhibition space will be added. With regards to the destruction of the building, Suzanne de la Rosa, a spokesperson for the Bodleian Libraries, said,  “in order for us to have the calibre of building and the sort of spaces that were needed for users, staff and collections the interior of the building did need to be revamped. We feel the end result will be a good mix of the old and the new.”She added that refurbishment of the New Bodleian building is part of a larger scheme to revitalize Oxford’s historic Broad Street by creating a new public square.De la Rosa added, “The building did not meet current British standards in terms of fire protection and conservation and that needed to be addressed. But that is not the sole reason for the redevelopment. This was the impetus to get us thinking about the kind of libraries that our users and Oxford needed and that was appropriate for our collections.” The new Library will eventually store a large proportion of the treasures of the Bodleian, including both Shakespeare’s first folio and the remaining original Magna Cartas, alongside thousands of other precious literary artefacts. The development is not received enthusiastically by all students. Abdul-Rahman Jama, a third year student at Balliol College, stated, “I could not possibly care less what is happlast_img read more

Weekend celebrates juniors, parents

first_imgNotre Dame welcomed juniors’ parents to campus last weekend, this time not to cheer for Irish football, but to attend Junior Parents Weekend (JPW).A committee of 13 juniors, led by JPW chairperson Shannon Hagedorn, planned the event, which aimed to expose parents to the strong sense of tradition at Notre Dame.“My goal for this year’s JPW was to make it a really special and elegant weekend,” Hagedorn said. “In selecting the program pictures, centerpieces and decorations, I tried to represent the tradition and magic of Notre Dame.”Even though severe storms in the Northeast prevented some parents from attending, 4,000 people were involved in the weekend’s events, Hagedorn said. Photo courtesy of Shannon Hagedorn Juniors and their parents mingle at the Junior Parents Weekend dinner Saturday in the Joyce Center. More than 4,000 people attended the weekend’s events, which also included a gala and dorm brunches.Hagedorn said the weekend involved a number of diverse events, including a gala, collegiate workshops, a JPW Mass and a president’s dinner.“It was so fun to see everyone mingling and dancing at the gala, meeting professors at the academic workshops, coming together for the Mass and sharing dinner and brunch together with incredible speakers, including keynote speakers [University President Fr. John] Jenkins, [junior class president] Olivia LaMagna and [director of the Institute for Educational Initiatives Fr. Timothy] Scully,” Hagedorn said.Junior Stephanie Scherer said JPW opened her eyes to how large the junior class was.“Sometimes you don’t realize how many people you don’t know until you’re all in one place,” Scherer said.Junior Catherine Puma said student involvement in the event helped build community within the junior class.“I feel a better sense of community, especially since we had student speakers, because so many people were involved,” Puma said.Junior Kathryn Bush said the experience gave her parents a chance to better understand her life at Notre Dame.“[Our] parents liked to see how we made the University our own,” Bush said.The weekend was not only an opportunity for students to interact, but for parents to meet their children’s friends and their parents, Puma said.JPW also reminded students that graduation is closer than they think, Scherer said.“It gives us a sense that we don’t have much time left here, so we want to enjoy it and have an impact before we leave,” she said.last_img read more

Kent pension fund backs managed run-down of Woodford fund

first_imgCharlie Simkins, chairman of the Kent Superannuation Fund committee, said: “We had not been made aware that the Woodford Equity Income Fund was being closed, as we were previously advised that the situation would be clarified in December.“However, we believe a managed run-down of the portfolio is in the best interests of all the fund’s investors.”Although it was disappointing that payments to investors would not now begin until January, rather than December, “the delay in recouping the Kent Pension Fund’s investment will not impact on the fund or its ability to pay members,” Simkins said.“The Kent Pension Fund is one of the top 10 largest local government pension schemes in the country and is one of the top performing.”Woodford Investment Management has been removed as manager of the equity income fund, which is to change its name to LF Equity Income Fund. BlackRock has been appointed transition manager to dispose of listed assets, and PJT Partners (Park Hill) as brokers to help sell unlisted assets.Subject to regulatory approvals, the winding-up is expected to begin in mid-January, after which money will be returned to investors in instalments. Link is meanwhile requesting formal approval from the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) to wind up the fund.Meanwhile, the FCA is carrying out an investigation into the activities that led to the high-profile fund suspension. The regulator is reviewing whether changes are needed to its rules about open-ended funds holding illiquid assets.Peter Brunt, associate director, equity strategies, manager research, Morningstar, said: “It was always going to be a monumental challenge for Woodford Investment Management to keep the LF Woodford Equity Income Fund going, even if it had successfully managed to reposition the portfolio for its re-opening in December 2019, as investor confidence had been so badly beaten down.” The pension fund for Kent County Council, a £6.4bn local government pension scheme, has said a managed run-down of the portfolio of beleaguered Woodford Equity Income Fund is in the best interests of all the fund’s investors.The Woodford fund was suspended in June following a surge in redemption requests from investors, including one from the Kent local authority pension fund, and today it was announced that it is to be wound up as soon as practicable rather than re-opened.In a letter to investors, Woodford Equity Income Fund’s authorised corporate director Link Fund Solutions said the suspension in June was designed to give Woodford Investment Management time to reposition the fund’s portfolio into more easily sellable investments but that while progress was made, it was not sufficient to provide reasonable assurance as to when the repositioning would be fully achieved.Neil Woodford, who managed the fund, reportedly hit back at the decision to close it, saying he did not think it was in investors’ long-term interests.last_img read more

Rates set to hold until November

first_imgThe housing sector is expected to be a big beneficiary of better lending conditions. Picture: Jodie Richter.“Based on these considerations, a “no-change” decision seems a certainty from the RBA Board meeting on Tuesday. Indeed the market has only a 4 per cent chance of a change priced in.”For the first time since last month’s cut, Monday saw the RBA Rate Indicator swing in favour of a cash rate target decrease to 0.75 per cent. “As at 5 August, the ASX 30 Day Interbank Cash Rate Futures August 2019 contract was trading at 99.115, indicating a 57 per cent expectation of an interest rate decrease to 0.75 per cent at the next RBA Board meeting.”That might not be enough though — with 96 per cent of experts and economists in the latest Finder RBA Cash Rate Survey convinced there RBA will hold at 1 per cent for several months. Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:58Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:58 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD432p432p216p216p180p180pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenHow much do I need to retire?00:58 Where tenants are ditching dead money for a mortgage Queensland is expected to see a surge in interest from interstate and other buyers given its relative affordability compared to southern neighbours, including Brisbane over Sydney and Melbourne.After a torrid two months of slashing, the Reserve Bank board is expected to hold fire until November on any further interest rate cuts — but there’s still lots to celebrate for buyers.Experts agree that November is the month the RBA board is most likely to make its next move on rates, as it waits for its shock two cuts in a row to take hold along with government action to boost consumer spending. FOLLOW SOPHIE FOSTER ON FACEBOOK Star puppet Agro making a move More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus12 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market12 hours agoRBA assumptions and forecasts. Source: RBA.gov.au”Our view remains that the RBA will deliver another 25bpt rate cut but they will wait until November to deliver that cut,” he said in CBA’s latest Economic Update. “The RBA has, of course, revealed its hand with 25bpt rate cuts in June and July. Successive rate cuts are rare events and normally reserved for dire economic circumstances. But circumstances, as the RBA assures us, are not dire. The RBA has indicated that it is prepared to wait while monitoring developments, especially in the labour market. MORE: The growth suburbs to watch It found 35 per cent of experts believed the next cut would come in November, while 23 per cent thought it would be earlier in October.Either way, Finder insight manager Graham Cooke said the RBA board would be hesitant to cut three months in a row.“The jury’s out on the impact of these most recent cuts — it’s simply too soon to tell,” he said. “Economists feel slightly more confident that recent cuts will have a positive effect on the economy once given time to roll out. While positivity is generally still low, housing affordability remains the most positive economic element.”Mr Blythe said CBA could “only agree” with a comment by RBA Governor Philip Lowe that “it is reasonable to expect an extended period of low interest rates”. Reserve Bank of Australia Governor, Philip Lowe, is expected to see the board hold at 1 per cent cash rate target come Tuesday afternoon. Picture: AAP Image/Dean Lewins.This after the RBA finally moved its cash rate target down to 1.25 per cent in June, followed rapidly by another 0.25 percentage point drop again in July to even out at 1 per cent. Before that it had stagnated at 1.5 per cent since August 2016.Aligned with APRA loosening its grip on lending conditions, boosting the chances of those applying for mortgages, the moves were expected to see some lift in the economy.Chief economist for one of the nation’s Big Four banks, Commonwealth Bank of Australia, Michael Blythe, expected the cash rate to remain at 1 per cent come Tuesday afternoon’s RBA monetary policy meeting.last_img read more