Taliban attack press in North Waziristan

first_img News Afghanistan : “No just and lasting peace in Afghanistan without guarantees for press freedom” AfghanistanAsia – Pacific RSF_en Organisation November 28, 2006 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Taliban attack press in North Waziristan to go further News News June 2, 2021 Find out more March 11, 2021 Find out morecenter_img May 3, 2021 Find out more RSF asks International Criminal Court to investigate murders of journalists in Afghanistan Receive email alerts Situation getting more critical for Afghan women journalists, report says AfghanistanAsia – Pacific Help by sharing this information Reporters Without Borders condemned Taliban reprisals against the press in North Waziristan in response today to an inaccurate report carried by several national and international media. A journalist’s son was kidnapped for several hours, media offices were attacked, copies of newspapers were burned and a two-day ban on newspaper distribution was proclaimed.“The Taliban reaction to an erroneous news report was out of all proportion,” the press freedom organisation said. “Caught in the crossfire between jihadists, the security forces and tribal chiefs, journalists work in extremely difficult conditions in the tribal areas. These incidents, combined with the detention of two Pakistani journalists by Afghan Taliban, highlight the dangers for reporters in this region.”Taliban stormed into the office of Haji Pazir, a journalist working for Urdu and English-language media, today in Miranshah (in North Waziristan), kidnapped his son and interrogated Pazir in an attempt to find out who was responsible for a false report about the death of several jihadist militants in the area. They also took copies of newspapers and burned them in the centre of the town. Pazir’s son was freed a few hours later.“The Taliban were questioning all the journalists and threatening them to get them to reveal who wrote this false report,” Pazir told Reporters Without Borders.A report posted yesterday on the BBC World Service’s Urdu-language website that was picked up by the Pakistani news agency Online and several Pakistani newspapers wrongly described the death of four Taliban as the first serious incident since the signing of an accord between the authorities and the Islamists. The BBC’s Urdu-language service apologised later yesterday, blaming the mistake on a technical problem.The Taliban subsequently announced a two-day ban on the sale of newspapers in the North Waziristan tribal area. “The final decision will be up our Shura (council),” Taliban spokesman Abdullah Farhad told journalists in Peshawar.Two journalists who were detained by Taliban in Afghanistan were Syed Saleem Shahzad of the daily The Star and Asia Times Online, and Quetta-based freelancer Qamar Yousafzai. They were held for five days in the Afghan province of Helmand for entering the province without Taliban permission. They were able to contact their families today from the border town of Chaman (in Balochistan province) following their release on 26 November. They were expected to return to Karachi soon. News Follow the news on Afghanistanlast_img read more

Lauren Worsham Looks Back on Her Killer Year in A Gentleman’s Guide

first_imgIn the corporate world, employees leaving a job are often asked to sit through an “exit interview” with HR about their time at the company. Although that concept doesn’t exist for Broadway performers, we love checking in with stars as they finish up a successful run. Tony-nominated A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder star Lauren Worsham will hang up her (very, very elaborate) hat on October 26, when she plays her final performance as Phoebe in the Tony-winning musical. As Worsham says farewell to her Broadway family at the Walter Kerr Theatre, she looks back on her “surreal and hilarious” run in A Gentleman’s Guide. What was the highlight of your time at this job? Meeting so many wonderful people. I love all of my co-workers so much. I also loved watching the show and its creators win so many awards! How did you feel when you first got the job? It felt surreal. I had been working so long in order to get to Broadway but along the way I veered into a different career path and thought maybe Broadway would never be interested. Mostly, it was a wonderful surprise! What are three words you would use to describe your experience? Surreal, hilarious, marathon. What skills do you think are required for future job applicants? Perseverance, calm in the storm and perspective plus a high soprano voice and killer comic timing. Catherine Walker, the new Phoebe, possesses all these in spades! What was the hardest thing? Balancing work and home life, missing dinner, constant vocal vigilance (no caffeine, alcohol, dairy, no yelling, complete vocal rest during busy weeks, etc.) while also trying not to say no to many extracurricular gigs like my band and other charity concerts. How do you think you’ve grown during your time at this job? I’ve learned boatloads about my limits as a singer and as a human. My voice has grown and my technique has become much more relaxed. I’ve learned there is a BIG difference between doing a show for three months versus twelve. View Comments How do you feel now that you’re leaving? I feel 100% bittersweet. I’m very excited about all my upcoming projects and about getting to spend more time with my family, but I am also very sad to leave my Walter Kerr family behind. You spend so much time together over a year and develop very strong bonds. I know I won’t see them all every day. If I’m lucky, once every few months, but maybe not for years. That’s heartbreaking. I’ll also miss the routine and ritual plus the gorgeous costumes and beautiful music. It feels like moving to a new city. Exciting, but sad and nostalgic. I’ll miss Phoebe too.center_img Related Shows Why are you leaving? I have so many diverse gigs coming up that it just didn’t make sense to stay timing-wise, but it was a very hard decision to make. Before the end of year I have nine concerts including Showboat with the New York Philharmonic and Not the Messiah at Carnegie Hall, not to mention a few Sky-Pony gigs as well. Also, in the opera and classical world pieces are cast years in advance. A few of my upcoming projects in 2015 were in the books before I even auditioned for GGLAM! Also, I’m really looking forward to the small breaks where I can spend time with my husband who hasn’t really had dinner with his wife in over a year. A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder What was the easiest thing about the job? The people. Every single person working at the Walter Kerr is an exemplary human and wonderful to be around. What advice would you give to future employees your position? One wrong note does not a performance make. It’s a marathon and not a sprint so keep the big picture in mind and have fun (the last part is easy). What will you miss most about the job? My family here, all the little show rituals, having a willing audience for my surplus of baked goods, having a second home in Times Square, the stunning clothes and being onstage with some of my most favorite people in the world. Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 17, 2016last_img read more

SCOTUS: TCPA exception violates First Amendment

first_img continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr The U.S. Supreme Court Monday released its decision in a lawsuit, Barr v. American Association of Political Consultants, Inc., challenging the Telephone Consumer Protection Act’s (TCPA) exception for government-backed debt. The Supreme Court found that it violates the First Amendment, upholding the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit’s decision in the case.Under the exception, calls intended to collect a debt owed to or guaranteed by the U.S. are exempt from the TCPA. The Supreme Court found that this provision is severable from the TCPA, leaving the rest of the law intact. The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals also previously found the exception violates the constitution.In addition to this issue, the Supreme Court could review the TCPA’s definition of an autodialer. In 2018, the Ninth Circuit expanded the definition; NAFCU has called on the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to take a narrower approach to defining an automatic telephone dialing system (ATDS).NAFCU has actively engaged with the FCC on efforts to modernize the TCPA for many years to ensure credit unions can contact their members regarding important, time-sensitive information, without fear of frivolous litigation.last_img read more

Watching the Mets Lose Two in Kansas City Is Hard to Take

first_imgView image | gettyimages.comThe way I see it, the Mets owe us big time for spending so many hours watching them lose two games in a row in Kansas City to a superior team. How they repay us is obvious. They have to host a victory parade down Broadway in Manhattan, and make sure we all have the day off so we can sleep in late.The opener on Tuesday was grueling enough—the longest World Series game in history measured by innings. By the time the final out was recorded in the 14th, five hours and nine minutes after it started, I was numb, both spiritually and physically. My eyes could barely see. My mind was shot.As they taught us by their debacle the following night, the first matchup was one the Mets had to win. All that effort gone to waste. I mean, on our part, as demoralized fans too masochistic to turn the damn thing off until some distant voice of reason, probably female, penetrated our consciousness with these words: “Go to bed!”After all, hadn’t we done our time already this season? Didn’t we stick with the Metropolitans back in July, when the needs of our families and our communities—hell, our republic, for that matter—went begging for 18 innings? It was July 19th, and the Mets only took a 1-0 lead over the St. Louis Cardinals in the top of the 13th inning, only to blow it in the bottom of the same inning when Jeurys Familia gave up a leadoff homer. No, I don’t want to remember it well—they did go on to prevail 3-1—but it came back to haunt me when Game 1 entered the midnight hour after he’d blown it in the ninth inning. I turned to my viewing companion, my son who had to get up even earlier the next morning than I so he could catch a train to the city, and asked him rhetorically, “How much longer should we watch this?”Well, the answer was obvious. To the bitter end. After all, past was prologue. We both stuck with the team in July, when the World Series seemed like a pipe dream, why would we be sensible now? Back then, Ruben Tejada—bless his soul, and curse Chase Utley’s—hit a sacrifice fly that allowed Wilmer Flores to score the go-ahead run. We got an insurance run on a squeeze bunt by Eric Campbell. Ah, those were the days, weren’t they? And let us recall that it was a day game, too.Tuesday night seemed to last forever. My son said he had a dream (perhaps a nightmare) later that it ended at 5 a.m. Let the record show it was over way before then. Apparently, we were not alone. The game was the most-watched World Series opener since 15 million viewers tuned into the 2010 matchup.This game, let’s face it, did have a little bit of everything. There was the first inside-the-park homer since the World Series of 1929 (and the anniversary of the Stock Market crash was this week, too, come to think of it)—and it came off the very first pitch that our Dark Knight, Matt Harvey, threw. That in itself is a rarity.And, laughing at their expense because it is Fox after all, there was a “rare electronics failure” that blew the game off the air—and onto our radios—in the fourth inning. Just like that, we all had to hunt for our AM dials, but just before we could settle in, the network figured out how to stream the international feed for domestic consumption. I just felt sorry for the hapless chaps back in the studio who had to make small talk while the engineers figured out how to override the meltdown. We haven’t seen anything like this since the Oakland A’s-San Francisco Giants World Series—dubbed the Battle of the Bay—was disrupted by a severe earthquake that struck in 1989 just as Game 3 was getting underway and knocked ABC off the air. By the way, the Giants were down two games to none. The bad news is that the Athletics went on to sweep them four-zip.Tuesday’s snafu also illustrates just how dependent America’s pastime has become on modern technology. The four-minute on-field delay was reportedly due to the replay capability being lost in both team’s clubhouses. We wouldn’t want to lose that, would we? Why, without replay capability, how could the game go on? Now, since it was Fox, nobody dared to blame the liberal media for screwing up, but the thought had to be in the noosphere. But they found the right switch and the game went on at Kauffman Stadium. For the record, the 2013 Super Bowl was delayed when the power went out in the Mercedes-Benz Superdome. That’s a more old-fashioned problem, but it certainly couldn’t have helped the automaker’s brand since play stopped for 34 minutes.Once Fox resumed its World Series coverage, it was amusing when Joe Buck—he of the five o’clock stubble—told the viewing audience that they had enough quarters to keep Game 1 on the air for the rest of the evening as he traded microphones with Matt Vasgersian and John Smoltz, who were handling the game for MLB International. Little did Buck know that the night was still young.Going into Wednesday night’s game from the Mets’ point of view, they probably figured that all their East Coast fans could use some shut-eye but they took it one step further, and seemed to nod off at the plate, getting only two hits off the Royals’ mighty-dreadlocked righthander Johnny Cueto, who pitched the whole damn game, while our long-haired phenom Jacob DeGrom hardly struck anybody out and got rocked instead. Our reputed ace gave up four runs in the fifth inning, and then it was lights out for him. For good measure other Mets pitchers came in in relief and allowed three more before the game was mercifully over, 7-1 the final score.Sleep, perchance to dream, never sounded so good Wednesday night. For the superstitious, the Mets lost by one run in the first game of the 1986 World Series and by six runs in the second game—and that was at Shea Stadium, where we teach future generations the Mets beat the Red Sox in Game 6, and, just as important, in Game 7.Whether history can repeat itself this time against Kansas is a question that remains to be seen. Too many Mets fans woke up Thursday morning thinking the world had ended, let alone the Series. But let us remember they’ve only played each other twice, and they have at least two more games to go.So, the message to us all: stay tuned. And hope the blessings flow. Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York last_img read more

Chattanooga faces Wofford in SoCon semis

first_imgSTELLAR SENIORS: Chattanooga has relied heavily on its seniors this year. Matt Ryan, Ramon Vila, David Jean-Baptiste, Rod Johnson and Maurice Commander have collectively accounted for 73 percent of the team’s scoring this season and 71 percent of all Mocs points over the last five games.NATHAN IS A FORCE: Nathan Hoover has connected on 30.1 percent of the 269 3-pointers he’s attempted and has made 10 of 35 over his last five games. He’s also made 92.8 percent of his free throws this season.THRIVING WITH THREES: Wofford is 5-0 when it makes 14 or more 3-pointers and 13-15 when it falls short of that total. Chattanooga is 12-0 when it makes at least 10 from 3-point range and 8-12 on the year, otherwise.ACCOUNTING FOR ASSISTS: The Terriers have recently used assists to create baskets more often than the Mocs. Chattanooga has an assist on 31 of 78 field goals (39.7 percent) over its previous three contests while Wofford has assists on 46 of 77 field goals (59.7 percent) during its past three games.TO ERR IS HUMAN: Wofford’s offense has turned the ball over 12.3 times per game this year, but is averaging 16 turnovers over its last five games.___ March 8, 2020 Associated Press For more AP college basketball coverage: https://apnews.com/Collegebasketball and http://twitter.com/AP_Top25___This was generated by Automated Insights, http://www.automatedinsights.com/ap, using data from STATS LLC, https://www.stats.comcenter_img Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditWofford (18-15, 10-10) vs. Chattanooga (20-12, 11-8)Southern Conference Tourney Semifinals, Harrah’s Cherokee Center, Asheville, North Carolina; Sunday, 5:30 p.m. EDTBOTTOM LINE: Wofford is set to take on Chattanooga with the victor securing its spot in the SoCon championship game. Chattanooga won both of the regular season matchups earlier this season. The teams last went at it on Feb. 8, when Wofford made just 10 free throws on 14 attempts while the Mocs hit 19 of 22 en route to a seven-point victory. Chattanooga faces Wofford in SoCon semislast_img read more