Lesley Manville on Getting Better With Age & Bringing Ibsen’s Ghosts to Life in London

first_imgLesley Manville has had an astonishing few years of late, moving from Ibsen at the National (Pillars of the Community opposite Damian Lewis) to John Guare at the Old Vic (Six Degrees of Separation, playing Stockard Channing’s original role) and now back to Ibsen with his classic drama, Ghosts in Richard Eyre’s intense production at the Trafalgar. Equally well known from her work in film, most notably with the writer-director Mike Leigh, the warmly engaging actress chatted with Broadway.com about keeping the classics alive, not going Hollywood and her fervent wish to bring this most recent project to New York. There is talk of Ghosts coming to New York. Would you be keen for that to happen? No question about it, I would love to. I am not yet ready to walk away from this play. You do seem to get an awful lot of roles where you are the mother to a dying child. Oh God, I know! When I was doing [Mike Leigh’s play] Grief at the National Theatre, my onstage daughter was played by the real-life daughter of my best friend, Janine Duvitski, whom I watched being born, so it was very strange having her die there with me at each performance. But these have all been magnificent, complex roles so I can hardly complain. Isn’t it amazing how how modern the play feels, even though it is being performed in period and was written in Scandinavia in 1881? Yes, what Richard has done so subtly is help the audience to absolutely register that the play is talking about them even though, as you say, we have period sets and costumes and everything. There are nights when I say as Mrs. Alving that my whole married life has been a vile sham, and I can sense a gasp from the house and I know that some poor person is experiencing or has experienced a version of what I just said. All throughout, you can hear the audience tingling at certain lines that in Richard’s adaptation bring the material home. You came to New York with Caryl Churchill’s now-classic play Top Girls some 30 years ago, and were married for a while to Gary Oldman, who became a major Hollywood star. Did you ever feel the need to base yourself in the States or make a bid for that kind of stardom? Not really, but don’t forget that when I was in my 20s, nobody really did that. I know it kind of happened to Gary, but that was sort of an exception and that came about because he’d made Sid and Nancy and Prick Up Your Ears. Then he suddenly he got offered this film [in 1989] called Chattahoochee, which led to work in the States. It was very unusual at that time. Certainly actors in my circle didn’t have American agents and weren’t auditioning for pilot seasons—it just didn’t happen. I’m sort of glad it didn’t, really, because honestly I do think that the true test of a decent actress is how good they can be on stage. How would you describe Mrs. Alving’s dilemma in the play? She has lived a lie her entire life—and kept the reality of her brutal marriage to her late husband quiet. She’s kept it a secret from her son, Oswald, who is on his way back to be with her from Paris, and even from the man she really loves who was the Pastor. The play can be said to take place at the point at which Mrs. Alving finds the courage to expose all of this because she has achieved a kind of liberation—until it then all takes a really bad turn. Your career flies in the face of the often-cited assertion that parts for women dry up as they get older whereas yours seem only to get better. I know, and I feel a bit guilty about that, but I think it is true that it gets harder. At the same time, I think there’s been a quiet change happening—a growing realization that there is an audience that wants to watch plays and television and films that deal with older women. So I do appreciate that the situation is difficult once you get to a certain age, but that I equally seem to be defying that!center_img Have you been getting audience members who think are coming to the now-closed London and Broadway musical Ghost? [Laughs.] I don’t think so, but you never know! You’ve had an amazing few years, but your performance as Mrs. Alving in Ghosts seems special even by those high standards. That’s very kind of you to say, and, you know, I do think Mrs. Alving feels like a kind of pinnacle—the culmination of a good few years of work that I’ve done in the theater and on film as well. It feels like the top of the mountain both in terms of the role and the play itself. View Comments Commercial productions of Ibsen are pretty rare, especially ones that are selling out as yours is. That’s very true, and I really do think we’ve broken a mold with this production, which in itself wouldn’t have been possible without doing it first at the Almeida, where the producer Sonia Friedman came to see us and now here we are. What Richard [Eyre, the play’s director and adaptor] has done is draw together a really good bunch of actors who were able to create the piece absolutely organically from the script that he had written and because of the talent in the rehearsal room, it just came very naturally to life. Is part of your career resurgence due to the fact that your son with Gary is now grown? Christ, yes! I was a single mother so there was a lot of stuff that I couldn’t do that—now that Alfie is 25—I obviously can do, so there’s a certain liberation to that. I remember particularly being asked to play Kate in The Taming of the Shrew for the Royal Shakespeare Company in Stratford followed by a 17-week tour, and I couldn’t do it; I had a six-year-old son.last_img read more

CALLING ON SALESPEOPLE – DONEGALDAILY.COM WANTS TO MAKE YOU AN OFFER!

first_imgDo you love everything about Donegal and are you looking for a job in sales?Well Donegaldaily.com could be the answer.We are looking for sales staff in both Inishowen and in the south of the county to spark a business revival. In less than a year we are now Donegal’s leading news website with a certified 90,044 unique users according to online giant Google.And a million hits per month!Quite simply people online in Donegal, log onto Donegaldaily.com.We want dynamic salespeople to go out and contact businesses across Donegal and further afield and tell them why they should be on our website. If you think you have what it takes to introduce businesses to a world of online potential and increased sales, then contact us NOW!For people interested in working as ad reps for us in Inishowen contact Don on 085 8504125 or those interested in working in the south Donegal should contact 086 0691684.EndsCALLING ON SALESPEOPLE – DONEGALDAILY.COM WANTS TO MAKE YOU AN OFFER! was last modified: November 11th, 2011 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

ASA Supports Presidents Commitment to Exports Biofuels

first_imgState of the Union includes remarks on ASA prioritiesThe American Soybean Association (ASA) appreciated President Barack Obama’s remarks on several of ASA’s top legislative priorities during his 2011 State of the Union address. President Obama encouraged job creation by doubling exports, passing the pending Free Trade Agreements (FTAs), expanding the use of renewable energy, and improving America’s infrastructure.”The American Soybean Association noted President Obama’s commitment to supporting the U.S. economy and job creation through increasing exports, expanding the use of renewable energy and increasing funding for infrastructure improvements,” said ASA President Alan Kemper, a soybean farmer from Lafayette, Ind. “These issues are top priorities for ASA, and we will continue to work with both parties in Congress as well as the Administration to achieve them.”President Obama reaffirmed his National Export Initiative goal of doubling exports in the next five years, saying, “Last month, we finalized a trade agreement with South Korea that will support at least 70,000 American jobs… and I ask this Congress to pass it as soon as possible.”ASA believes that efforts to achieve the goal of creating more U.S. jobs and the doubling of exports will require Congressional approval of the pending FTAs with South Korea, Colombia and Panama, and renewal of Presidential Trade Promotion Authority to enable the negotiation of new FTAs with key importing countries.”U.S. soybeans and soy product exports had a total value of more than $21 billion for the 2009-10 marketing year, making the U.S. soybean industry the largest positive commodity contributor to the national trade balance,” Kemper said. “Just last week a visiting delegation of companies from China signed contracts to purchase $6.68 billion worth of U.S. soybeans in 2011.”President Obama also talked about investing in and increasing research on clean energy technology and biofuels, saying, “With more research and incentives, we can break our dependence on oil with biofuels.”ASA registered a significant victory on behalf of U.S. soybean farmers with last month’s passage of the retroactive biodiesel tax incentive extension through the end of 2011. The one-dollar-per-gallon tax credit is structured in a manner that makes biodiesel more competitive with petroleum diesel fuel in the market place.”The biodiesel tax credit has a direct impact on jobs and is critical to supporting the biodiesel industry, a major market for U.S. soybean oil and a key factor in supporting domestic soybean prices in recent years,” Kemper said. “Biodiesel reduces our dependence on imported petroleum, it’s good for the environment, and it’s the only commercially available advanced biofuel in the market today.”President Obama also spoke about improving infrastructure, saying, “We’ll put more Americans to work repairing crumbling roads and bridges,” and noting that engineers gave U.S. infrastructure a low grade.”ASA supports increased funding for the nation’s transportation infrastructure for road, rail and waterway improvements that will benefit U.S. soybean farmers by helping them move their product across the U.S. and to ports that will ship soybeans and soybean products to our trading partners around the world,” Kemper said. “Over 75 percent of U.S. soybean exports move to world ports via the upper Mississippi and Illinois River systems, but the locks, dams and channels on these river systems are crumbling and in desperate need of modernization.”last_img read more