Volunteer rain collectors

first_imgGeorgia weather experts need precise, timely information on the amount of rain and when it falls across the state. With good access to the Web and rain gauges in hand, citizens can help.The non-profit organization Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network, known as CoCoRaHS, is looking for volunteers to collect rainfall data in Georgia, said Pam Knox, the state’s assistant state climatologist and researcher with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.“This is a great chance for weather enthusiasts and average citizens to be part of a project that collects vital rainfall data,” said Knox. “The data is readily available to the general public and other organizations. It is also critically important to understanding how rainfall varies around the state in times of limited water supply, such as the current drought in Georgia.” So far, 150 Georgians from 58 counties have signed up this spring, she said. But more volunteers are needed, particularly in south Georgia.Volunteers must purchase and use a rain gauge able to measure to the one-hundredth of an inch. A good one costs $22 plus shipping and handling, she said. They will be trained to use an interactive Web site to post data.Information the volunteers collect will be used by climatologists, hydrologists, water resource managers, UGA Cooperative Extension agents and experts with the National Weather Service, she said.“Official measuring stations across the state are sparse, and rainfall can vary quite a bit over short distances,” Knox said. “With trained volunteers, CoCoRaHS helps fill these gaps and supply users with a better picture of rainfall patterns.”An introductory meeting and training session will be held on the UGA campus in Athens on May 22 at 7:30 pm in the Driftmier Engineering Center auditorium on Agriculture Drive. The guest speaker will be Colorado State Climatologist Nolan Doesken, the founder of the CoCoRaHS network.The CoCoRaHS program started in Colorado in 1998. The network now includes 31 states and more than 9,000 observers who take daily measurements of rain, hail or snow. It is funded by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the National Science Foundation.To volunteer or to learn more, visit the Web site www.cocorahs.org or, send an e-mail to [email protected]last_img read more

U.S. Coal Production Drops Faster Than Expected, and Well Ahead of Clean Power Plan

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Chris Mooney for the Washington Post:Looking at annual production numbers over the past few years, combined with EIA’s prediction for total production in 2016:The U.S. produced 999.7 million short tons of coal in 2014, according to EIA, the large majority of which was consumed to generate electricity right here at home. However, in 2015 that dipped to 895.4 million short tons, a drop of more than 100 million tons in just one year. The drop, incidentally, was considerably more than EIA itself had forecast around this time a year ago, when the agency had expected a decline to 926 million tons.So there was a big decline in U.S. coal production when comparing 2014 with 2015 — but looking at 2016, the drop is expected to be even bigger.“Forecast coal production is expected to decrease by 143 [million short tons] (16%) in 2016, which would be the largest annual percentage decline since 1958,” says EIA. Total production is forecast to just be 752.5 million short tons, or an over 200 million ton decline from the level just 2 years ago.This, too, was not what EIA was expecting. It thought a year ago that coal production would be at 941 million tons this year, a number that looks like it’s now set to be close to 200 million tons off.The gist? Coal production in the United States is falling, faster than expected and long before the U.S. Clean Power Plan, which was stayed by the Supreme Court, has come into effect.These striking numbers show just how fast we’re switching off coal U.S. Coal Production Drops Faster Than Expected, and Well Ahead of Clean Power Planlast_img read more

HUGE ARMY OPERATION IN INISHOWEN AS TROOPS PREPARE FOR LEBANON

first_imgTHESE are the scenes as Ireland’s soldiers prepare for peacekeeping missions in the fields around Inishowen.Our exclusive pictures were taken as up to 150 soldiers re-enacted full military confrontation at Fort Dunree yesterday.The troops from the 104th Infantry Battalion based at Finner Camp in Bundoran took part in the exercise in preparation of a peace-keeping mission to Lebanon later this year. The mission is at Lock stage meaning it has been passed by both the United Nations and the Cabinet and is awaiting full Dail approval.The two day operation also involved two AW130 helicopters and up to 50 vehicles including armoured cars, troop carriers, soft-skin vehicles and ambulances.The exercise also involved many specialist soldiers including engineers and bomb disposal experts carrying out full military manoeuvres.The public had received an earlier warning that heavy machinery as well as machine gun and other fire would be heard in the region. As well as Fort Dunree, a number of fields were used in the region to carry out the operations.A spokesman for the Army Press office said “This was a full military scenario to help troops prepare for a situation they may face if they travel to Lebanon.”The exercise was overseen by Brigadier Comdt.Gerry Hegarty, Commander of the 4th Western Brigade.HUGE ARMY OPERATION IN INISHOWEN AS TROOPS PREPARE FOR LEBANON was last modified: March 23rd, 2011 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

FIRST TWO GARDA STATIONS TO CLOSE ARE NAMED

first_imgTWO of possibly 12 Garda stations to close were named today.They are at Culdaff and Dunkineely.Up to ten more in the county will be closed as part of Government cutbacks. Most will be part-time stations.FIRST TWO GARDA STATIONS TO CLOSE ARE NAMED was last modified: December 5th, 2011 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:donegal garda stations to closelast_img read more