Second Paraguayan journalist slain near Brazilian border in less than two years

first_img May 19, 2014 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Second Paraguayan journalist slain near Brazilian border in less than two years February 10, 2017 Find out more News Latin America’s community radio – a key service but vulnerable RSF_en Reporters Without Borders is shocked to learn that local radio journalist Fausto Gabriel Alcaraz was gunned down by two individuals on a motorcycle in the eastern border city of Pedro Juan Caballero on 16 May. Alcaraz, who worked for Radio Amambay, was shot 11 times.Senator Robert Acevedo, the station’s owner, said that Alcaraz had often accused people by name of involvement in regional drug trafficking in his radio programme.“It is vital that this murder should not go unpunished, as is so often the case in Paraguay,” said Camille Soulier, the head of the Reporters Without Borders Americas desk. “It must be thoroughly investigated in order to identify those responsible and the possibility of a link to the victim’s work must not be ruled out straight away. The situation of the people who worked with Alcaraz is also very worrying right now. We urge the authorities to give them protection.”Alcaraz was the second journalist to be murdered in less than two years in Pedro Juan Caballero, the capital of Amambay department, which borders Brazil and is a major Southern Cone drug trafficking hub. There is tension between politicians and traffickers on both sides of the border and journalists often bear the brunt of the violence.Marcelino Vásquez, the director of local radio Sin Fronteras, was gunned down by two men on a motorcycle in Pedro Juan Caballero on 6 February 2013. Radio Mburucuyá director Santiago Leguizamón was killed in a similar fashion in the city in 1991. None of these murders has been solved.Ranked 105th out of 180 countries in the 2014 Reporters Without Borders press freedom index, Paraguay suffers from systematic impunity, which needs to be addressed rapidly. The need for a national protection mechanism for journalists in Paraguay was stressed in the annual report that the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights published on 23 April. to go further Organisation News Receive email alerts ParaguayAmericas center_img News Brazilian journalist murdered at home in Paraguay February 14, 2020 Find out more News Help by sharing this information ParaguayAmericas Follow the news on Paraguay Reporter killed in ambush after police protection withdrawn October 20, 2014 Find out morelast_img read more

Watching the Mets Lose Two in Kansas City Is Hard to Take

first_imgView image | gettyimages.comThe way I see it, the Mets owe us big time for spending so many hours watching them lose two games in a row in Kansas City to a superior team. How they repay us is obvious. They have to host a victory parade down Broadway in Manhattan, and make sure we all have the day off so we can sleep in late.The opener on Tuesday was grueling enough—the longest World Series game in history measured by innings. By the time the final out was recorded in the 14th, five hours and nine minutes after it started, I was numb, both spiritually and physically. My eyes could barely see. My mind was shot.As they taught us by their debacle the following night, the first matchup was one the Mets had to win. All that effort gone to waste. I mean, on our part, as demoralized fans too masochistic to turn the damn thing off until some distant voice of reason, probably female, penetrated our consciousness with these words: “Go to bed!”After all, hadn’t we done our time already this season? Didn’t we stick with the Metropolitans back in July, when the needs of our families and our communities—hell, our republic, for that matter—went begging for 18 innings? It was July 19th, and the Mets only took a 1-0 lead over the St. Louis Cardinals in the top of the 13th inning, only to blow it in the bottom of the same inning when Jeurys Familia gave up a leadoff homer. No, I don’t want to remember it well—they did go on to prevail 3-1—but it came back to haunt me when Game 1 entered the midnight hour after he’d blown it in the ninth inning. I turned to my viewing companion, my son who had to get up even earlier the next morning than I so he could catch a train to the city, and asked him rhetorically, “How much longer should we watch this?”Well, the answer was obvious. To the bitter end. After all, past was prologue. We both stuck with the team in July, when the World Series seemed like a pipe dream, why would we be sensible now? Back then, Ruben Tejada—bless his soul, and curse Chase Utley’s—hit a sacrifice fly that allowed Wilmer Flores to score the go-ahead run. We got an insurance run on a squeeze bunt by Eric Campbell. Ah, those were the days, weren’t they? And let us recall that it was a day game, too.Tuesday night seemed to last forever. My son said he had a dream (perhaps a nightmare) later that it ended at 5 a.m. Let the record show it was over way before then. Apparently, we were not alone. The game was the most-watched World Series opener since 15 million viewers tuned into the 2010 matchup.This game, let’s face it, did have a little bit of everything. There was the first inside-the-park homer since the World Series of 1929 (and the anniversary of the Stock Market crash was this week, too, come to think of it)—and it came off the very first pitch that our Dark Knight, Matt Harvey, threw. That in itself is a rarity.And, laughing at their expense because it is Fox after all, there was a “rare electronics failure” that blew the game off the air—and onto our radios—in the fourth inning. Just like that, we all had to hunt for our AM dials, but just before we could settle in, the network figured out how to stream the international feed for domestic consumption. I just felt sorry for the hapless chaps back in the studio who had to make small talk while the engineers figured out how to override the meltdown. We haven’t seen anything like this since the Oakland A’s-San Francisco Giants World Series—dubbed the Battle of the Bay—was disrupted by a severe earthquake that struck in 1989 just as Game 3 was getting underway and knocked ABC off the air. By the way, the Giants were down two games to none. The bad news is that the Athletics went on to sweep them four-zip.Tuesday’s snafu also illustrates just how dependent America’s pastime has become on modern technology. The four-minute on-field delay was reportedly due to the replay capability being lost in both team’s clubhouses. We wouldn’t want to lose that, would we? Why, without replay capability, how could the game go on? Now, since it was Fox, nobody dared to blame the liberal media for screwing up, but the thought had to be in the noosphere. But they found the right switch and the game went on at Kauffman Stadium. For the record, the 2013 Super Bowl was delayed when the power went out in the Mercedes-Benz Superdome. That’s a more old-fashioned problem, but it certainly couldn’t have helped the automaker’s brand since play stopped for 34 minutes.Once Fox resumed its World Series coverage, it was amusing when Joe Buck—he of the five o’clock stubble—told the viewing audience that they had enough quarters to keep Game 1 on the air for the rest of the evening as he traded microphones with Matt Vasgersian and John Smoltz, who were handling the game for MLB International. Little did Buck know that the night was still young.Going into Wednesday night’s game from the Mets’ point of view, they probably figured that all their East Coast fans could use some shut-eye but they took it one step further, and seemed to nod off at the plate, getting only two hits off the Royals’ mighty-dreadlocked righthander Johnny Cueto, who pitched the whole damn game, while our long-haired phenom Jacob DeGrom hardly struck anybody out and got rocked instead. Our reputed ace gave up four runs in the fifth inning, and then it was lights out for him. For good measure other Mets pitchers came in in relief and allowed three more before the game was mercifully over, 7-1 the final score.Sleep, perchance to dream, never sounded so good Wednesday night. For the superstitious, the Mets lost by one run in the first game of the 1986 World Series and by six runs in the second game—and that was at Shea Stadium, where we teach future generations the Mets beat the Red Sox in Game 6, and, just as important, in Game 7.Whether history can repeat itself this time against Kansas is a question that remains to be seen. Too many Mets fans woke up Thursday morning thinking the world had ended, let alone the Series. But let us remember they’ve only played each other twice, and they have at least two more games to go.So, the message to us all: stay tuned. And hope the blessings flow. 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My entry to the ring against Momba on Dec.26 will be extraordinary- Tagoe

first_imgEmmanuel Tagoe has promised another intriguing entry when he mounts the ring against Sidicki Momba on December 26 in Accra.The ‘Game Boy’ will be coming up against his Tanzanian counterpart for the WBA Intercontinental Championship in the bout being staged by Asamoah Gyan’s Baby Jet Promotions.Tagoe is promising another grand entry into the ring to continue  his tradition of a jaw-dropping introduction.Game Boy entered the ring in the heated bout against George Ashie in a King’s Palanquin while emerging on the back of a horse – enjoying a kingly ride – when he fought Ronald Pontillas.The James Town native without giving anything away promises another exciting entry on his Boxing Day bout against Momba.“Everyone knows how I take my entry very serious,” he told AsamoahGyan3.com. “It is always an opportunity to make a statement and I do not shy away from that.“I will come up with something exciting but then you have to be there to see.”Ticket prices for the bout on December 26 are already out with ringside tickets going for 50 Ghana cedis and regular pegged at 10 Ghana cedis.last_img read more

Three nominees sent to governor for Iowa Supreme Court opening

first_imgDES MOINES — The state’s Judicial Nominating Commission has sent the governor the names of three judges as candidates to fill an opening on the Iowa Supreme Court.Governor Reynolds now has 30 days to name a replacement for Justice Daryl Hecht. He resigned in mid-December, for health reasons.Kellyann Lekar of Waterloo is the chief judge in Iowa’s first judicial district. She’s been a judge since 2005 and is one of the three nominees to replace Hecht. Dustria Relph, a district court judge from Corydon, worked as a nurse before becoming a lawyer and she’s on the nominee’s list. Christopher McDonald — the third nominee for the opening on the Iowa Supreme Court — is currently serving on the Iowa Court of Appeals.Nineteen judges and attorneys were interviewed by the Judicial Nominating Commission for this opening on the state’s highest court. The commission’s work happened as Republican lawmakers, including Governor Reynolds, have discussed changing the membership of the commission.last_img read more

Training a Thoroughbred for Monmouth Park

first_imgArt Petrosemolo will follow Rainbow At Midnite when she returns to Monmouth Park in April and will be at the rail when she goes to the starting gate for her first race. By Art PetrosemoloVeteran New Jersey thoroughbred trainer John Mazza and owner Rosemarie Shockley are getting close to an answer for their $64,000 question.Exercise rider heading to the track for early morning workout at Gulfstream Park, Hallandale, Fla.After two years of careful handling, good food, vitamins, visits to the vet, romping in the paddock and Florida training, Mazza and Shockley soon will know if their group of Holly Crest thoroughbreds have what it takes to succeed in the sport of kings.Two-year-old gray filly Rainbow At Midnite and her six stablemates will relocate from Florida’s Circle S ranch to Monmouth Park soon for final race-ready preparations before their first start. Midnite’s sister Holy Rainbow, a three-year-old, has run well at Florida’s Gulfstream Park with two solid third-place finishes. It has pleased Mazza and Shockley and has given them hope for Midnite.Mazza, who has trained Vincent Annaralla’s horses at Holly Crest Farm in Locust, for years, says, “training is not an exact science. Everyone goes about it a little different. But with correct breeding, proper handling and good training, you could – if the horse has a competitive spirit – have a fast and successful thoroughbred.”Translated, fast and successful means capable of succeeding in allowance and even stakes races and not missing a paycheck! “If the horse just doesn’t have the speed or the heart to be a winner,” continues Mazza, “then you hope the genes are good so that he or she might pass it along to offspring.”Two year olds enjoy the Florida sun in the Circle S paddock.Thoroughbred training is a long and expensive process. Horses are foaled in the winter (hopefully January to March) and grow under the watchful eye of the broodmare and the farm staff. Food, care and surroundings all contribute to early growth as horses stay with their mothers for most of their first year. (Every thoroughbred ages one year on Jan. 1.)During its second year, the thoroughbred, now called a yearling, continues to grow and mature with other yearlings spending the warm months in grassy paddocks. As they turn two, trainers and owners decide when and if the yearling will be broke and readied for the track. There are special trainers and farms in the southern United States that specialize in getting these feisty fillies and colts to mature before the final exam at a racetrack a few months away.Third generation trainer Tim Kelly is preparing the Holly Crest hopefuls for racing this year at Circle S Ranch in Florida horse country about a half-hour from Gulf­stream Park. Kelly says when the two year olds arrive at the farm – usually in December – they spend the first month getting used to people and being touched and handled. “We brush them, talk to them, clean their feet and bathe them daily,” he says. “These horses have spent the first two years of their lives growing and playing with minimum human contact.”A pair of Holly Crest Farm two year olds work out on the soft track at Circle S Ranch.Kelly then begins to get each thoroughbred comfortable with the racing equipment including saddle cloth, saddle and bridle. “This is the first time these animals have had anything in their mouths,” he says, “and it isn’t natural.”It could be as long as eight weeks in the training program before a thoroughbred feels the weight of an exercise rider on its back and it doesn’t like it. Says Kelly, “Anything on a horse’s back is a predator and the horse will try to buck him off in self defense.” The phrase “breaking horses” comes from getting the horse to break the habit of resisting being ridden.The maturing but still feisty two year olds train six days a week and start by learning to walk, jog and gallop in a round pen, attached to a tether and then under the hands of the exercise rider. The thoroughbred then learns how to respond to the rider’s steering through the bridle by walking and jogging in figure eights and other patterns in a larger pen.But it isn’t all work, all day, says Mazza; two year olds spend the afternoons enjoying Florida weather grazing in large, shaded paddocks.Holy Rainbow in her morning workout at Gulfstream Park.Once the two year old is schooled, Kelly moves them to the training track. At Circle S, the oval is one-half mile with a starting chute and starting gate. “The surface is deep and soft,” says Mazza, “which allows the horses to develop bone and muscle.” The two year olds train un-shoed until their feet reach adult size in early spring and they may only have their front feet shoed to start.Horses work in groups. At Circle S, they are trained in pairs. “We have horses gallop in front of each other so the trailing horse gets used to sand in its face,” Kelly explains. They also gallop beside each other so they get used to running in close quarters and they change positions during each session, each day.Rainbow At Midnite gallops on the soft surface at Circle S Ranch getting ready for her debut at Monmouth Park later this spring.Mazza and Shockley make the trip to Circle S each week to watch the two year olds and confer with Kelly on their training. Mazza can tell when a “baby” (as he calls them) is progressing as expected. “You can tell the way they walk, jog, gallop and carry themselves,” he says.It’s all about bringing a horse along at the right pace, Mazza feels. “I am old school,” he smiles, “and I take the extra time to get the two year old ready. I only have one chance with each horse to do it right and I don’t want to rush it.” Mazza wants to see a two year old come back from a mile gallop unwinded and ready for more. When Holly Crest horses arrive at Monmouth Park in April, Mazza says he continues to bring them along slowly until he is sure they are ready for their first race.Trainer John Mazza watches a pair of Holly Crest two year olds exercise on the Circle S training track.Two year olds are not timed while in the breaking process. Trainers won’t have any idea of what speed these horses have and whether they might be better for short or long races until they “breeze” (gallop) 5/8 of a mile later this spring at their home track. It’s then that trainers will begin to get the answer to the $64K question on whether these young thoroughbreds have what it takes. The first final exam – a maiden race against other two year olds for a purse – comes soon after. And only then will Mazza and Shockley get their first real answer to whether they have a winner.last_img read more

Dr Paul Wright: Who is accountable?

first_imgThe ‘Diamond Mile’, the richest race in the history of horseracing in the English-speaking Caribbean, was completed at Caymanas Park last Saturday. The day saw 14 races being completed with record attendance, a record handle (money bet on the races), great dividends, and exciting finishes. Sponsors were there in their numbers; no money was spared in the preparation of the in-field for special guests; and a good time should have been had by all. Wrong. Whereas all the above is in fact true, the regulators had to have their now mandatory stab at “spoiling the party”. In the 10th race of the day, the betting favourite was horse number two, Silver Cloud. After being loaded into the starting gate, the horse squatted/fell in the gate, throwing the jockey head over heels (a poop-a-lick) backwards on to the surface. Luckily, the jockey was not hurt and quickly picked himself up and did some checks to make sure that he was all right. absolute shock To the absolute shock of racing fans, the horse was not removed from the gate for inspection by the veterinarian on duty at the gate. Our shock turned into dismay as the horse staggered out of the gate and trailed the field home, obviously feeling some effect of the fall. In every other racing jurisdiction where the safety of the participants (horse and rider) is the priority of paid individuals, that horse would have been examined out of the starting gate BEFORE the horse was allowed to start! But this is racing in Jamaica. who cares? If the horse is seriously injured and falls during the race, injuring the rider and possibly any of the other participants, oops, who won? Can this sport be allowed to continue like this? Apparently, YES. No one cares. No one is accountable. The day was an economic and sponsors success. So what? Divestment IS the only answer. However, with a somnolent Divestment Committee “waiting on Godot”, nothing even close to an announcement will come until a few days before the election, which has now been pushed back to “one day soon”. HELP! privileged positions The much-anticipated and longed-for meeting of the West Indies Cricket Board and the CARICOM subcommittee on cricket was held last Friday. After a three-hour meeting, the recommended dissolution of the board was not discussed as the reports out of the meeting suggest that the board has no intention of giving up its privileged positions. They have agreed to meet again on December 13, and, hopefully, the anxious West Indian fans will hear something from Mr Pybus and ‘President Dave’ about the recent revelation from reinstated coach Phil Simmons. Simmons had mentioned, before a failed attempt to silence him, that there was outside interference in the selection of the West Indies team. Fans of West Indies cricket (the “few” of us left) know that the only hope for the resurrection of cricket in the region rests solely on the removal of a group of men described by one of their own (Baldath Mahabir) as “unprofessional, tardy, or lax in many instances”. As our ancestors have taught us, “If fish come from river bottom and say that shark down there, believe him”. Administrators of sports worldwide will not give up their privileged position no matter what. FIFA continues trying to run football as the majority of that body’s executive is arrested on numerous charges. Sports can be saved. We the people have to insist on transparency and integrity of those who “volunteer” to run sports. We have to!last_img read more

5 things to know about new travel booking platform

first_imgThe man behind Apple News wants to shake up the travel industry and give travellers a cut of commissions from online hotel bookings.Jochem Wijnands launched TRVL this year. Here are five things you should know about using the online platform.What is TRVL?TRVL is a website that allows travellers to sign up as so-called TRVL agents and search for hotels for their trips or recommend places to stay to others. The agents receive a commission — up to 10 per cent — any time someone books travel through a link they provide.Who can use it?Anyone over 18 can sign up for the service, so long as they abide by the site’s rules.Anyone can message a TRVL agent on the website, without having to sign up, and book a recommended hotel through a link they provide. However, the site is currently blocked in Ontario.Where does the commission money come from?Online booking websites, like Booking.com and Hotels.com, have a built-in portion of the price that typically goes to a travel agent, said Wijnands.Travellers who book online themselves pay that fee but don’t receive the service, he said.TRVL lets its agents recoup that cost by cutting them in on the commission hotels pay to websites that send customers their way.How much does it pay?TRVL agents receive up to 10 per cent of the cost of the hotel booking in payment 30 to 60 days after the trip takes place. So, travellers can recoup up to $20 on a $200 hotel, for instance. However, money earned for each booking depends on the price of the hotel and the percentage of commission TRVL offers.Does it cost anything to book?The service is free to use. TRVL makes its profit by taking a cut of the commission its booking service providers pay.last_img read more

Saskatchewan premier says his province will also table oil ban bill

first_imgEDMONTON – Premier Scott Moe says Saskatchewan will join Alberta in a fight with B.C. over the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion by introducing its own legislation on oil exports.Moe says his government will bring in a bill in the coming days that could result in less oil moving to British Columbia.“We do ship some energy products to British Columbia but not a huge amount. The majority of the energy products that are shipped to British Columbia come from Alberta,” said Moe in Regina.“What we’re saying is if they (Alberta) turn off those taps, Saskatchewan won’t be here to fill those (B.C.) fuel tanks.”Moe said he wants the legislation passed in the current session of the legislature so that it can work in tandem with Alberta’s legislation.Alberta Premier Rachel Notley’s government introduced a law on Monday that would give the province power to unilaterally reduce exports of oil and natural gas.The bill aims to give the energy minister authority to intervene in the market, via direct licences to companies, to decide when and how certain oil and natural gas products are exported.Moe said his bill is still being worked on, but it is likely to involve a similar permitting process.“That’s something that we would look at very closely, and if not mirroring (Alberta’s bill) being something similar.”In Edmonton on Tuesday, Alberta Energy Minister Marg McCuaig-Boyd welcomed Saskatchewan’s actions.“I appreciate that they also see the importance of the energy industry to Alberta and indeed to the country,” she said.Alberta and B.C. have been at odds over the Trans Mountain project, which was approved in 2016 but has been hamstrung by court challenges and permit delays in B.C.Alberta says the expansion is critical to reduce bottlenecks that cost Canada $40 million a day in lost revenue, but B.C. says it remains concerned about potential oil spills on its waterways and coastline.The future of the $7.4-billion project is uncertain. Earlier this month, pipeline-builder Kinder Morgan announced it was ratcheting back spending on it, because the actions of the B.C. government have sown investor uncertainty.Kinder Morgan has set a deadline of May 31 to get a tangible sign from Canada that the project can and will be completed.Alberta and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s government are discussing taking an equity stake in the pipeline to ensure it gets done.Moe said he’s not concerned that the bills might result in court challenges and fines as a breach of free-trade rules.He said it’s an unusual and unfortunate situation that began with B.C. interfering in a federally approved interprovincial pipeline.“We hope it doesn’t come to this. We truly don’t. This is not a conversation we want to be having,” he said.Alberta’s oil sells at a discount on North American markets due to lack of market access outside the United States.Moe said that same discount affects Saskatchewan and has a domino effect, because oil transported by rail means delays in moving other products such as grain and potash. He estimates the oil differential costs Saskatchewan $150 million a year.last_img read more

BC Wildfire Service implements category two burning ban in northeast BC

first_imgthe open burning of any material (piled or unpiled) smaller than two metres high and three metres wideburning barrelsfireworksstubble or grass fires over an area smaller than 2,000 square metresThe prohibition does not apply to category three fires or campfires that are a half-metre high by a half-metre wide or smaller, or to cooking stoves that use gas, propane or briquettes.The BC Wildfire Service has upgraded the fire danger rating in the Fort St. John and Dawson Creek areas. As of Wednesday, the fire danger rating has been upgraded to from low to medium in the two communities, though it is still low across the rest of the B.C. Peace Region.This map shows the areas affected by the burning ban.Anyone lighting a campfire must maintain a fireguard by removing flammable debris from around the campfire area, and they must have a hand tool or at least eight litres of water available nearby to properly extinguish the fire.These prohibitions cover all BC Parks, Crown lands and private lands, but do not apply within the boundaries of a local government that has forest fire prevention bylaws in place and is serviced by a fire department. Please check with local government authorities for any other restrictions before lighting any fire.Anyone found in contravention of an open burning prohibition may be issued a ticket for $1,150, required to pay an administrative penalty of $10,000 or, if convicted in court, fined up to $100,000 and/or sentenced to one year in jail. If the contravention causes or contributes to a wildfire, the person responsible may be ordered to pay all firefighting and associated costs. FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – Effective noon on Saturday, category two open fires and the use of fireworks will be prohibited within the Dawson Creek, Fort St. John and Fort Nelson fire zones.The BC Wildfire Service is implementing these prohibitions to help prevent wildfires sparked by Category 2 burns, due to dry and windy conditions in the forecast. These prohibitions will remain in place until the public is otherwise notified.The prohibitions will apply to Category 2 fires: Report a wildfire or unattended campfire by calling 1 800 663-5555 toll-free, or *5555 on a cell phone. For the latest information on current wildfire activity, burning restrictions, road closures and air quality advisories, go to: http://www.bcwildfire.caThis poster shows what is covered under the open fire regulations in B.C. Photo by B.C. Wildfire Service.last_img read more

Solskjaer appointed as permanent Man Utd manager

first_imgLondon: Manchester United appointed Ole Gunnar Solskjaer as the club’s permanent manager on a three-year contract on Thursday following a highly successful caretaker spell in charge. The Norwegian, 46, has inspired a dramatic revival of United’s fortunes since taking over from the sacked Jose Mourinho in December, winning 14 of his 19 games and leading the Red Devils to the quarter-finals of the Champions League. Solskjaer, who scored 126 goals in 366 appearances for United, was already a hero to fans as the man who scored the stoppage-time winner in the 1999 Champions League final to complete the treble. Also Read – Puducherry on top after 8-wkt win over Chandigarh “From the first day I arrived, I felt at home at this special club,” Solskjaer said in a statement on the club’s website. “It was an honour to be a Manchester United player, and then to start my coaching career here. “The last few months have been a fantastic experience and I want to thank all of the coaches, players and staff for the work we’ve done so far. “This is the job that I always dreamed of doing and I’m beyond excited to have the chance to lead the club long-term and hopefully deliver the continued success that our amazing fans deserve.” Also Read – Vijender’s next fight on Nov 22, opponent to be announced later United’s executive vice-chairman Ed Woodward said: “More than just performances and results, Ole brings a wealth of experience, both as a player and as a coach, coupled with a desire to give young players their chance and a deep understanding of the culture of the club.” After Mourinho was sacked following a 3-1 loss to Liverpool on December 16, Solskjaer initially arrived from Norwegian club Molde “on loan” until the end of the season. Solskjaer, who spent 11 seasons at Old Trafford as a player, took over with the club in sixth place in the Premier League, 11 points off the top four. But they have lost just once in the league since then and are now in fifth place, just two points behind fourth-placed Arsenal, with eight games remaining in the season. The highlight of his reign so far was a dramatic 3-1 victory over Paris Saint-Germain in the last 16 in the Champions League, with United overturning a 2-0 first-leg defeat to reach the quarter-finals on away goals. Solskjaer’s former United teammate Peter Schmeichel tweeted: “Congratulations my friend, it is well deserved. Up and onwards let’s chase some trophies.” Former United defender Gary Neville welcomed the appointment and urged the club to back the new full-time boss financially. “I’m delighted for Ole,” Neville tweeted. “I didn’t think this would happen when he was appointed. However the results and spirit in the club have been incredible since he arrived and he deserves it. He now needs support in the transfer market in terms of finance and the right resource!” Another former United teammate of Solskjaer’s, Rio Ferdinand, tweeted: “Yessss Ole is officially at The Wheel… Signed, Sealed, Delivered! Manager of @ManUtd! I hope my Thank You is in post Ole.”last_img read more