Jamaica rebound with massive win in Regional Women’s Super50

first_imgCALIFORNIA, Trinidad (CMC):Title-holders Jamaica crushed North Windwards to post their first win, while hosts Trinidad and Tobago carved out a steady victory over Guyana in the third round of the Regional Women’s Super50 here yesterday.At Gilbert Park, the Jamaicans pulled off a resounding 116-run win, while at Macaulay Park, the Trinidadians eased to a six-wicket verdict to record their second win of the tournament.Jamaica would have been the more relieved with their result, however, after losing their opener to Barbados last Thursday and then suffering a no-result against South Windwards two days later.Sent in, Jamaica tallied 148 all out off their 47 overs, with Chedean Nation and Vanessa Watts top-scoring with 28 and Chinelle Henry getting 20.They had a shaky start when they lost West Indies players Natasha McLean for 10 and Stafanie Taylor for three, to slip to 31 for two in the 10th over.However, Nation and Watts pulled the innings around in a 47-run third-wicket stand, which came from 67 deliveries. Neither batter managed a boundary.Henry, batting at number five, then arrived to play a busy knock of 20 off 26 balls, with three fours.Seamer Krisani Irish was the best bowler with four for 30, while Qiana Joseph (2-18) and Swayline William (2-23) picked up two wickets apiece.In reply, North Windwards slid to 32 all out off 16.5 overs, with off-spinner Watts wrecking the innings with four for 10 and Taylor taking three for four with her off-breaks.no double figuresNot a single player reached double figures, with Irish’s five being the top score.T&T, meanwhile, racked up a crucial second win to follow up their eight-wicket victory over South Windwards last week.Winning the toss and opting to field, they reduced Guyana to 101 for eight off 50 overs, and then easily overhauled their target off 30 overs.Opener Amanda Samaroo top-scored with 32 from off 75 deliveries, with two fours, adding 31 for the second wicket with Shenelle Lord, who made 10. Off-spinner Plaffiana Millington was the best bowler with two for 41.Earlier, Guyana made heavy weather of their innings and never really got going, despite Shemaine Campbelle’s top score of 25 and Melanie Henry’s 21.Henry and Lashuna Toussaint (7) put on 28 for the first wicket, but the partnership consumed 67 balls and set the momentum for the innings.Off-spinner Karishma Ram-harack (2-14) and slow medium Felicia Walters (2-22) finished with two wickets apiece.last_img read more

Hundreds of Indigenous human remains at Canadian universities

first_imgMartha TroianAPTN InvestigatesUniversities across the country are housing hundreds of Indigenous human remains, ranging from small bones fragments to complete skeletons and some from as far back as the ninth century.Repatriation of remains to the communities they originated from is slow but they should be returned, said Ry Moran, the director of the National Centre for the Truth and Reconciliation.Many of those human remains have been with the universities since the 1920s and they are stored in plastic bins, wooden trays and even cardboard boxes, APTN Investigates has learned from a survey of more than 12 universities across Canada.Institutions were asked a set of questions about Indigenous human remains within their institutions and just one, the University of Saskatchewan said they did not have remains.McGill University does not have remains onsite, but since 1987, the 200 skeletal parts belonging to the university have been stored at the McCord Museum in Montreal.“We’ve got this very unbalanced country right now, these materials, humans remains, cultural artifacts are scattered throughout the world, many of them taken without any consent from the community at all,” said Moran.“The communities themselves have been prevented from, and disempowered from creating cultural institutions of their own and that’s by virtue of the Indian Act…so it’s just a real challenge.”Ranging from bone fragments to complete skeletonsOf the 12 universities contacted, the University of Toronto has the highest number of Indigenous human remains, with 550 individuals, all of which are bone fragments.Edward Banning, Professor and Graduate Chair in the Department of Anthropology with the university, stated that the oldest remains are dated to the ninth century with most remains from the 17th century.“Human remains, for spiritual reasons, need to be put at rest and it is completely wrong for any people to have human remains in their institutions,” said activist and artist Christi Belcourt.“People’s bodies need to be respected.”(Christi Belcourt)Memorial University of Newfoundland has the second highest number of Indigenous human remains with approximately 197 individuals, both complete and incomplete.Even though the Rooms Corporation — the home of the provincial museum — is responsible for the remains, they are housed at the university wrote Mark Ferguson, the manager of collections at the museum, in an email.These Indigenous remains date as far back as 7,000 years ago.The University of British Columbia was unable to provide the total number of human remains, stating an analysis would have to be conducted.APTN asked for an estimate, but the institution declined to provide one.Generally, most universities have Indigenous remains ranging from small bone fragments to multiple full skeletons. Remains are also predominantly from the same province the university is located in.For example, the University of Victoria houses remains primarily from Vancouver Island.UVic was unable to provide the number of remains because they are fragmentary and no attempt has been made to identify whether they belong to one or more individuals.In some institutions, the remains come from other parts of a province or country.Of the 63 human remains held by Western University based in London, Ont., one skull is from Nunavut.The University of Manitoba has remains from British Columbia, North Dakota, Florida and even Ghana in its collection.Most Indigenous remains in these universities are stored in plastic bags, then in specialized cardboard boxes and placed on shelves or in cabinets.These remains arrive at these institutions in a variety of ways, such as through archaeological excavations, development projects and construction sites.Some remains are also handed over to the universities after police departments determine they are not of forensic interest.Repatriation slow and recentAlthough some universities are repatriating Indigenous human remains back to their rightful communities, the process has been slow and a long time coming.Recent examples include the University of Winnipeg, who returned 18 individuals in 2017, with six more scheduled in spring 2018. Currently, the university has 145 remains made up of a single tooth to a complete skeleton.Western University returned remains to a nearby Indigenous community in mid-October 2017.The largest repatriation to date was done by the University of Toronto, returning approximately 1,760 remains in 2013. The remains were in most cases from ossuaries, the university said.With approximately 59 First Nation partial remains at its institution, John Danakas, executive director with public affairs at the University of Manitoba said only one request was made by an Indigenous group in the last 27 years for the return of remains.The bones were eventually repatriated in 2002. Danakas stated no other requests have been made since then.Some institutions will either work with one community or several to return remains, as in the case of the University of Alberta, who previously worked with 14 communities across the province to rebury 25 individuals near Lacombe in 2014.“If we don’t do it ourselves it doesn’t get done”“We need to find a new path forward but communities have been so disempowered over the years that we have to ask ourselves if there’s a capacity and that’s really fundamental,” said Ry Moran, referring to whether communities have a place for these remains.“It is now only Indigenous people that can really determine what should happen with this material and new conversations have to be happening across the country.”(Ry Moran)APTN asked the universities what they’re doing to help repatriate more remains.Many said they welcome the opportunity to work with anyone who requests the return of remains but not all institutions have repatriation policies.Lakehead University and UVic are among those that do not have a repatriation policy.For some universities, covering the cost to get some of these returns back to Indigenous communities is not an option.“In terms of the actual cost, that is a burden on the community. They bear the cost of coming down, they bear of the cost of return, they bear the cost of any ceremony that takes place,” said Susan Rowley, the director with the Laboratory of Archaeology at UBC.“That’s something that is very difficult,” Rowley said.UBC will help with the paperwork and any events that might take place on the day remains are returned.“I think history has proven that if we don’t do it ourselves it doesn’t get done,” said Christi Belcourt.“We can say that others should pay for this and they should, but is that the reality of what will happen? No.”[email protected] Follow @ozhibiiigelast_img read more

Robert Griffin III Must Protect Himself – Or Take

It is ironic that during the week the Washington Redskins devised a game plan to minimize exposure of their prized rookie quarterback Robert Griffin III to potentially vicious hits, Griffin got blasted by the Atlanta Falcons’ Shawn Witherspoon, causing a mild concussion.The Redskins were traumatized to see Griffin wobbled, but hope that he would be OK to play next week when they host the Minnesota Vikings. They also hope Griffin finally learned a lesson. There were no need for him to take that hit Sunday.He was not going to get to the end zone. There was ample time for him to throw away the ball and let the field goal unit come onto the field. Or he could have just sprinted out of bounds. Trying to cut back against two defenders that had the angle on him set himself up to take a legal but devastating hit from Witherspoon, jolting his head back before crashing to the turf.“We’d like to have him throw the football away when he’s outside of the pocket,” team leader London Fletcher said after the game, “and not take the hit like that.”It is admirable to be so competitive and to be willing to sacrifice his body. But Griffin has to be smarter. There is a lot of value to playing is conservative in order to stay on the field. He appears to be a smart guy, so it stands to reason Witherspoon hammered home the message of protecting himself.All he has to do is look at Michael Vick of the Philadelphia Eagles and see how much punishment he continues to take week after week through a reluctance to get out of bounds, slide feet forward or throw away the ball. Those are three options Griffin has to employ.Coach Mike Shanahan said Griffin was removed because he could not answer basic questions about the game, such as the score and what quarter it was. Griffin Tweeted that he will play next week against the Vikings, but, under league rules, Griffin will not be permitted to practice or play until he is cleared by neurologists that have no association with the Redskins.Without Griffin, the Redskins’ chances for success diminish exponentially. Rookie Kirk Cousins took advantage of busted Falcons coverage and hit Santana Moss for a 77-yard touchdown during his action replacing Griffin. He then threw two interceptions in his last two passes, helping Atlanta secure the win. The idea that Rex Grossman could return as starting quarterback makes Redskin fans everywhere as loopy as Griffin felt Sunday. Whenever he returns, Griffin must protect himself with wise decisions when under duress — or the kind of abuse Witherspoon inflicted will not be the last. read more

Government Commits 70 Million to Help Trelawny Farmers Transport Sugar Cane

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#Jamaica, February 16, 2018 – Montego Bay – Minister of Industry, Commerce, Agriculture and Fisheries, Hon. Karl Samuda, says the Government has committed another $70 million to assist farmers in Trelawny with the transportation of sugar cane to the Appleton Estate and Worthy Park factories this year.Speaking at the opening ceremony of the 63rd Hague Agricultural and Industrial Show in Trelawny on Wednesday (February 14), Mr. Samuda said the Government is cognisant of the challenges being faced by farmers since the shutdown of sugar production at the Clarks Town-based Long Pond Factory in the parish a few years ago.“I have been able to support you, so far, and I could never turn my back at this stage when things are so difficult.   And, that is why I said to the Permanent Secretary, only two days ago, that we cannot leave the farmers of Trelawny to suffer the consequences of not having the resources to transport the cane,” Mr. Samuda pointed out.“And so, we decided that we are going to provide the same amount that we provided last year, which was $70 million.  I had said $50 million, but I told him, add $20 million to it, so that we can be assured that all the farmers’ cane will be transported to the factory,” he added.The Minister recounted that the Government had kept the Long Pond Sugar Factory open in the first year of assuming office, but noted that he had indicated, at the time, that this could not be continued, as the “cost of keeping it open was too great for the Government to underwrite”.As a consequence, he said, the Ministry had moved to provide money to assist small farmers in particular, to transport the sugar cane from Long Pond to Appleton Estate in St. Elizabeth and Worthy Park in St. Catherine.Mr. Samuda said he remains highly optimistic that the sugar cane industry will continue to thrive in Trelawny, despite the various challenges, noting that there are forthcoming developments that will give rise to an even greater demand for the produce.  He said that Everglades, owners of Long Pond, continues to pursue its objective of trying to restructure the plant, so that it can produce energy to supply the Jamaica Public Service (JPS) Company.  This, he noted, will require increased cane production.“I have great hopes… . I have expectations for the expansion of cane in Trelawny, not the contraction.   And even if there is a shift in the kinds of crops, the employment must be maintained and expanded upon, and I will do everything within my power to see to that,” Mr. Samuda said.Release: JIS Related Items: Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApplast_img read more

Leicester defender open to United move

first_imgLeicester City defender Harry Maguire has opened the door to a move to Manchester United by revealing it would be hard to down a move to club participating in the UEFA Champions League.Maguire has been a transfer target for United during the summer transfer window after an impressive 2018 World Cup with England, but Leicester’s refusal to let him leave ultimately meant he had to commit his immediate future to the club.The former Hull City defensive stalwart signed a new five-year deal with Leicester last month, but United are still said to be interested in the England international, who has refused to rule out a move to a Champions League outfit.harry maguire, manchester UnitedMaguire says United need to build on today’s win George Patchias – September 14, 2019 Harry Maguire wants his United teammates to build on the victory over Leicester City.During the summer, Harry Maguire was referred to as the ultimate…“Yes, definitely it would be a difficult one (to reject a move to a ‘giant’ club). I’m an ambitious player. If you’re not an ambitious footballer, you’re in the wrong game really,” Maguire told BBC Sport.“Everyone wants to play at the top level, everyone wants to play in the biggest tournaments in the world, so obviously the Champions League is one.”Maguire joined the Foxes from Hull City in 2017 and has featured 52 times in all competitions for the Foxes.last_img read more

Quality of Education Highlighted at Whiteman Air Force Base

first_img ADC AUTHOR Education was celebrated as a key contributor to defense community quality of life and overall mission readiness earlier this month at Whiteman Air Force Base, Mo., during the Wings Over Whiteman Air Show.Officials from Knob Noster Public Schools, which serves the installation’s community, as well as several federal and state policy makers, gathered to recognize the high-performing education programs and partnerships that are helping support military-connected students and the installation.Former Congressman John Kline of the Every Student Succeeds Act, Christi Ham, Chairwoman of Military Families for High Standards, Joe Driskill, President of the Association of Defense Communities, and Jim Cowan, Executive Director of the Collaborative for Student Success, joined Col. Jeffrey Schreiner, Commander of the 509th Bomb Wing, and Jerrold Wheeler, Knob Noster Public Schools Superintendent, to highlight recent advancements which have significantly enhanced quality of education serving the installation.Over the last four years, Knob Noster Public Schools has implemented highly successful programs in STEM, robotics, advanced placement, cybersecurity, aviation, computer science, leadership and character education. As rigor and relevance was increased through these programs, Knob Noster students responded with overwhelmingly positive results. The students’ performance led to Knob Noster High School being recognized as Missouri’s top rural school in 2019.“In Knob Noster and Whiteman Air Force Base, we know strong schools and strong installations go hand in hand,” Knob Noster Public Schools Superintendent Jerrod Wheeler said. “Serving the students and families of Whiteman Air Force Base and strengthening the mission is a responsibility every member of our Knob Noster team takes seriously.”With the community’s continued educational success, the district is also under consideration for the prestigious Pete Taylor National Partnership of Excellence Award through the Military Child Education Coalition.“Through our partnerships, innovation and collective commitment, we have transformed Knob Noster Public Schools into one of the top school districts in Missouri and one of the top heavily military-impacted school districts in the country,” Wheeler said.Photo provided by Knob Noster Public Schoolslast_img read more