Microsoft, SA push ICT access

first_img6 October 2005Microsoft South Africa and the Universal Services Agency, an information and communications technology parastatal, and have announced a partnership to increase the number of South Africans with access to technology.The parties signed an agreement setting up the partnership at Gallagher Estate in Midrand, Johannesburg on Monday.As part of the agreement, Microsoft SA’s digital villages – or community technology learning centres – will over the next three years be taken into the government’s network of multi-purpose community centres.Microsoft SA currently runs 49 digital villages around the country, centres where community members can learn about computers and how to use them.The government, for its part, has set up more than 50 multi-purpose community centres across SA – one-stop shops offering a range of government products and services, as well as educational, technological and other resources.Microsoft has undertaken to provide free software, the sharing of its “unlimited potential” curriculum, as well as management and IT training for the new partnership.Microsoft and the Universal Services Agency will partner in training multi-purpose community centre managers in IT and small business management, including training in facilitating discussions with communities, fundraising, and running a small business in the South African landscape.Speaking at the signing, Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer said they hoped to reach over half a million people through the project.“Through these community-driven partnerships we hope to make a positive impact on South Africa’s ‘second economy’,” Ballmer said.“By working with NGOs and community leaders, we also anticipate assisting small businesses … to take advantage of information communications technology in their quest to succeed.”Ballmer said Microsoft remained convinced of the power of technology as a social and economic enabler, and believed it was key to the promotion of sustainable growth and development for South Africa.Source: BuaNews Want to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

4-H projects aplenty at the Ohio State Fair

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Of course, there is no shortage of hard work, long hours and dedicated young people in the livestock barns at the Ohio State Fair, but those who think that is the only place to find impressive Ohio youth 4-H projects are missing out. Here are some highlights of the incredible wood working projects at the Ohio State Fair.PHOTOS BY RANDALL REEDER These are the 8 Clock Trophy winners in 4-H Woodworking. A total of 259 participated in the competition. The judge interviews a contestant about the chest of drawers with a mirror attached. Steven Hayes, Auglaize County, made this chest of drawers out of cherry. He won the Clock Trophy in his class. Tim Herman, Williams County, won the Clock Trophy in the third year Small Engines project. He will represent Ohio at the National Youth Engineering Challenge. Outstanding of the Day ribbons were earned by Jacob Clubb, Brown County, and Gunner Green, Butler County. Thomas Burkett of Tipp City (Miami County) won a Clock Trophy in Rope. He made a hammock. Joey Finney, Stark County, and Cody Wagner, Sandusky County, each won Clock Trophies and a welder donated by Lincoln Electric. They will represent Ohio 4-H in Welding at the National Youth Engineering Challenge at Lafayette, Indiana in Sept. 25-27. In all, Lincoln Electric donated 10 more welders to age-group winners, and Miller Electric donated 10 welding helmets to the second place finishers. This piece of furniture, built by 4-H’ers for the Ohio State Fair, is of much higher quality than the furniture written about herelast_img read more

20 days agoEngland coach Southgate challenges axed Spurs midfielder Alli

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say England coach Southgate challenges axed Spurs midfielder Alliby Paul Vegas20 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveEngland coach Gareth Southgate has explained axing Dele Alli from his latest squad.Tottenham midfielder Alli has only just returned from injury but, while Southgate admitted dropped players is the hardest part of his job, he insisted he will never pick players on reputation or name as was the case in the past.England boss Southgate said: “I think when you’re selecting a squad, the players need to see some sort of meritocracy when possible, and like I said in there, to bring those guys back in, who am I going to leave out?“With Dele [Ali] and Alex [Oxlade-Chamberlain] in particular, they haven’t really had the number of games this year to get themselves into a rhythm. They’re both recovering from different injuries, one long term, one a bit shorter term.“So, I’m expecting those guys to really push – you know they are both fighters, there have been good conversations with both of them. The pressure is on guys who go in to play well and impress.“But we want to look at some of the young players. Let’s invest time in some of those younger players. Let’s have a closer at them, knowing that we’ve got to keep winning matches now by exposing people to the level and the environment and seeing how they cope with it.” last_img read more

Amy Childs Joins Great British Bagathon

first_imgThis September, Amy Childs is joining in the Great British Bag-athon and clearing out her wardrobe to fill up bags full of unwanted things.The goal is to raise 1 million bags of unwanted things for the British Heart Foundation during the month of September.Amy Childs says: “I’m thrilled to be supporting the Great British Bag-athon and had a big clear out so that I could donate as many bags of unwanted things as possible to my local shop. This is a cause close to my heart as my cousin had open heart surgery when she was born, so I have seen firsthand the fantastic work the BHF funds.“I’d like to encourage everyone to set aside some time this September and help raise bags of unwanted things for the Great British Bag-athon. Those unwanted killer heels can help give heart disease the boot.”If you’d like to follow in Amy’s footsteps and donate bags of your unwanted things to the Great British Bag-athon, find out more here. Every bag you fill is a bag full of life-saving research.Source:last_img read more

Saganash Racism faced by Indigenous people on street linked to Ottawas prejudicial

first_img(NDP MP Romeo Saganash. File/APTN)Jorge Barrera APTN National News OTTAWA–Ottawa’s historic adversarial posture on Indigenous rights proves institutional racism exists and it’s linked to the racism faced by Indigenous people on the streets of Canada’s cities, says Cree NDP MP Romeo Saganash.The country’s problems with racism were again highlighted last week when national news magazine Maclean’s reported Canada had a bigger race problem than the U.S. The ensuing debate over the magazine’s reporting echoed a controversy that flared in 2001 when former Assembly of First Nations national chief Matthew Coon Come said Canada was afflicted by institutional racism.Saganash said Coon Come was right then and the current grand chief of the James Bay Cree Nation of Iiyuuschee is still right.“The Aboriginal people of this country are the only group that are subjected to that treatment of having the government of Canada as an adversary throughout the history of Canada,” said Saganash, who is MP for Abitibi-Baie James-Nunavik. “It is the only group subjected to that, so yeah, of course Matthew Coon Come is right. It is institutionalized and it has to stop.”At the time, Coon Come faced a backlash from then-Indian Affairs minister Robert Nault who demanded the former AFN national chief apologize for his remarks.Nault, who was a minister in the Liberal Chretien government, is again seeking to run under the Liberal banner in Kenora, Ont. In an interview with APTN National News last week, Nault said he still stood by his belief racism in Canada is not institutional, but rather individual.“(Nault) is a pretty good demonstration that successive Liberal and Conservative governments over the past 150 years will not change, will not be able to address the fundamental issues of Aboriginal rights and Aboriginal title,” said Saganash. “Having Robert Nault come back for the Liberals is saying, ‘we are giving you more of the same.’”The current federal Aboriginal Affairs minister is refusing to be drawn into the latest version of the racism debate in Canada.Newly appointed NDP Aboriginal Affairs critic Niki Ashton pressed Valcourt on the issue during question period Monday.“Canadians are finally talking about the horrific levels of racism faced by Indigenous people in cities like Winnipeg and elsewhere…From health care to police protection to employment and education, Indigenous people are too often treated as second-class citizens. That treatment as second-class citizens often has a direct correlation with government policy put forward by this federal government,” said Ashton. “Instead of being part of the problem, will the minister of Aboriginal Affairs commit to working with Indigenous communities and Canadians to put an end to racism that Indigenous people in Canada face?”Valcourt, however, ducked the question and didn’t even use the word “racism” in his response.“Our government believes that Aboriginal people should have the same quality of life, the same opportunities and the same choices as all other Canadians,” said Valcourt, in response. “That is why we continue to work and to take concrete actions on priorities that we share with First Nations and Aboriginals, such as on economic development, good governance, skills training, and on advancing treaty negotiations and reconciliation and we will continue in that vein.”Saganash said he isn’t surprised Valcourt is refusing to address the issue of racism.“I think it’s because they don’t know how to deal with it, it is so deeply institutionalized,” said Saganash.Saganash said one way to eradicate institutionalized racism from federal policies is to ensure the country’s laws comply with the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Saganash has put forward a private member’s bill to do that and it is scheduled to come up for its first debate on March 12. If the bill fails to pass a vote on second reading, it will die.  Saganash said he hopes the bill will at least make it through second reading so it can be studied at the House of Commons committee level.“We have to make the declaration into law in this country,” said Saganash. “It will have positive impacts…If we make sure every piece of legislation introduced in Parliament is in compliance with the UN Declaration there will be no need to challenge any legislation.”Saganash plans to hold an information session on his private member’s bill on Feb. 23 and he plans to invite Valcourt and his parliamentary secretary Mark Strahl. Saganash said the meeting will also be open to the public.Bill C-641 faces a tough road with the Harper government which has said it considers the declaration “aspirational’ after initially refusing to endorse it at all. At the UN, Ottawa’s diplomats are constantly fighting to dampen the impact of the declaration, especially its article on free, prior and informed consent, whenever it surfaces during international discussions, said Saganash. Just last October, in Rome, during meetings of the Committee on World Food Security, Canadian diplomats inserted a full page into a final report explaining that it saw the section on free, prior and informed consent as a matter of “meaningful consultation.”During a panel on reconciliation held on Jan. 7 in Massey College, Saganash said the actions of Ottawa’s diplomats “erode confidence and trust” in Canada.“Genuine reconciliation is not possible when such far-reaching and prejudicial conduct continues to take place,” said [email protected]@JorgeBarreralast_img read more

Terriers Were Once The Greatest Dogs In The World

15-inch beagle2 Newfoundland2 Embed Code Of course, other breeds have their own issues. Where terriers are blessed with pluck, beagles, for example, “you have to convince them that they love what they’re doing,” Darlene Stewart, a committee chair for the National Beagle Club, told me. Training, rather than grooming, might be the main challenge.Ultimately, each dog is judged according to its own breed’s rubric. In the Best in Show ring, a dog competes against the others, but also against the platonic ideal of its own breed. And these ideals are public record. The American Kennel Club’s standard for the wire fox terrier, for example, comes in at just over three dense, single-spaced pages. Old English sheepdog2 BREEDBEST IN SHOWS The breed group system was introduced at Westminster in 1924. The number of groups has increased since then; I’ve backdated the present group definitions for the chart above.2Five of the groups were introduced in 1924, the hound group was added in 1930, and the herding group was created in 1983. For the cat-fanciers among you: The sporting group is home to your retrievers and spaniels; the working group to huskies and mastiffs; the toys are pugs and Shih Tzus; the non-sporting are Dalmatians and bulldogs; the hounds self-explanatory; and the herding group is sheepdogs and collies.“Terriers are in many ways the most homogenous group of breeds,” Flyckt-Pedersen said. Terrier breeds tend to be similar to one another, especially compared with the heterogeneity of the non-sporting group, for example, which is home to both the Lhasa apso and the Norwegian lundehund.If terriers were once the Yankees of Westminster, one terrier breed in particular was their Babe Ruth: the wire fox terrier. Flyckt-Pedersen, who has bred terriers since 1963, called wire fox terriers “the ultimate” terrier breed. “They were hunting dogs, and they had to be tough and fearless to hunt badgers and foxes,” he said. “They have to have a real personality, they have to have a real character, and they have to be confident and, hopefully, fearless.” Wire foxes alone have won 14 Westminster Best in Shows. A distant second: another terrier. The Scottish terrier has won eight. Scottish terrier8 Norwich terrier2 Miniature poodle3 Oliver Roeder and Jody Avirgan visit the Westminster Dog Show on our podcast What’s The Point. And there is a disconnect between popularity in the broader canine world and success in the silk-stocking milieu of Westminster: Ubiquity doesn’t necessarily lead to first-place ribbons and shiny pewter bowls. No Labrador retriever (“America’s dog,” per the vice president of the American Kennel Club) has ever won Best in Show at the Garden. Nor has a retriever of any kind. No beagle had until 2008, despite more than 70 years in the popularity top 10.Some popular dogs do take the top prize, though. Poodles of various types have taken nine titles, and cocker spaniels, which have enjoyed two distinct reigns as the country’s most popular breed, have won four. In some sense, popularity is bound to help. “If a breed is bred in numbers and bred by serious people, the chances that you breed something fantastic is higher than if it’s a small breed, with a small number of breeders,” said Flyckt-Pedersen, the terrier judge.Some breeds have seen boom times. Chief among them: the French bulldog, Rottweiler, Maltese, and Siberian husky, each of which has risen from obscurity around 1950 to prominence today. But so far only one of these — a Siberian husky back in 1980 — has taken Best in Show. Smooth fox terrier4 Black cocker spaniel2 “A lot of working-class people were involved with them in the U.K. because it was a hobby,” Green said. “It didn’t cost a lot of money to keep a dog and breed a few dogs, and working-class people would breed puppies and make a little money doing that.” Someone was always in the market for a good show dog. “A good one is always what everybody was looking for,” Green said.A “good one” was exactly what George Thomas was always looking for. In 1939, The New York Times called Thomas “one of America’s greatest all-around dog experts” when he judged Best in Show at Westminster. But it was his business acumen decades earlier that drove him to this distinction. Beginning in the late 1800s, Thomas imported terriers from England to the United States, and business was good. The English press dubbed him the “American Ambassador.” He imported hundreds of the greatest wire fox terriers ever produced in England to the U.S.The rich East Coasters who bought the dogs often got more than a dog in the deal. “George Thomas would say, ‘OK, I can get you the foundation stock; I can get you a man from England to come over and take care of the dogs and groom them for you,’” Green said. “And he did, literally, scores of people, started their kennels for them.”And judging by news reports from Thomas’s time, this was a profitable business. The 1915 Westminster champion, yet another wire fox terrier, was plucked from “the obscurity of an English barnyard” for 2 pounds. On our side of the pond, one Boston terrier3Actually the result of breeding bulldogs with the (now extinct) English white terrier. at the 1907 show sold for $1,000 — about $27,000 today — to “a prominent New Yorker.” Doberman pinscher4 Westminster’s dog show is the second-longest-continuously-running sporting event (if you’ll permit it the label) in the country, after the Kentucky Derby (ditto). Since Westminster first crowned a Best in Show, in 1907, 46 winners have been terriers. Of the 43 Best in Shows that were awarded in the first half of the 20th century, 29 went to a terrier.1There was no Best in Show awarded in 1923. The first three Best in Shows all went to the same terrier — Warren Remedy, a fox terrier. The terrier “is to Westminster awards what Meryl Streep is to the Oscars, except that the terriers win more,” The New York Times wrote in 2003. But this has changed. The market and tastes that made terriers such popular show dogs in the first half of last century shifted, and a broad decline in terrier popularity is now mirrored by fewer terrier Best in Show titles. “The domestic dog is a genetic enterprise unique in human history,” a team of biologists wrote in a 2004 paper in Science. The animals are all one species — Canis familiaris — but they range from the diminutive 8-pound Brussels griffon to the massive 150-pound Neapolitan mastiff. But with the exception of the Boston terrier’s one-year reign in 1935, only four dogs have taken turns atop the American Kennel Club’s most popular breed list: the cocker spaniel, the beagle, the poodle and the Labrador retriever. Afghan hound2 The word “terrier” comes from the Middle French chien terrier — literally, dog of the earth. The dogs were originally bred to kill vermin — there’s still a breed known as the rat terrier. And it is this hunter’s instinct, this fearlessness, that has come to define the temperament of the breed today. As A. E. Housman, the English scholar and poet, wrote, “I can no more define poetry than a terrier can define a rat.” Hunting — like poetry to a poet — is just what terriers do.This temperament is highly valued in the present-day show terrier. “When a terrier group comes into the ring, they’ll all look confident and seem to enjoy doing what they’re doing,” Geir Flyckt-Pedersen, this year’s Westminster terrier group judge, told me.Terriers may have a temperament made for a dog show, but their coats are the stuff of nightmares. To maintain the coat coloring that is valued in the breeds, and to keep it properly harsh, a show terrier’s hair must be pulled, plucked and stripped, by hand. Every day. Illustration by Sean Sims. Frame photo by DeAgostini / Getty Images Stingray of Derryabah, a Lakeland terrier, won Best in Show at Westminster in 1968 and Best in Show at Crufts, the U.K.’s major dog show, the year before. Photo courtesy of AKC Gazette Collection Standard poodle4 Thomas’s heir apparent in the trans-Atlantic dog trade was Percy Roberts, who started as a kennel boy for Thomas when he was 16 years old. During his 70-year career, Roberts was terriers — “a leitmotif of the 20th century in dogs,” according to The Canine Chronicle, a show-dog magazine. Roberts won his first Best in Show, with a wire fox terrier, in 1926. And then the stock market crashed.Roberts was traveling from England to America with thousands of dollars’ worth of dogs in 1929 when he got news of the crash. He didn’t go back to England for another four years. The Gilded Age was, by now, a distant memory, and the Great Depression had begun. “There were some big kennels that went kaput when the crash came,” Green said. The Manhattan dollars that had been put toward show dogs dried up, squeezing the terrier-import business. Not only had the terriers themselves cost good money, but so had the mercenary experts that undertook the intensive endeavor that is terrier maintenance. And so went the terrier demand.And then television came along. While Black Tuesday changed the business from the U.S., a few decades later, mass media changed it from England. The English working class that was largely responsible for raising the dogs turned to other leisure pursuits. “So instead of you going outside in a cold shed and pulling hair, you can watch a football game, and you’re sitting in your kitchen by the fire,” Green said. “Well, which would you rather do for a hobby?” And so went the terrier supply.Echoes of these effects are visible in data. The American Kennel Club, which is the governing body for dog shows and whose membership includes Westminster, tallies the most popular breeds in the country each year, going back to 1935. This data is based on purebred dog registrations with the club, which says it registers nearly 1 million dogs each year. (There are something like 80 million dogs owned in the U.S.)4I obtained rank data — the American Kennel Club doesn’t release raw registration numbers. The club ranked roughly the top 100 breeds for the early years of this data set, increasing to roughly 175 breeds in more recent years. Many of the all-star terrier breeds5Those that have won more than two Best in Shows through 2015. The smooth fox terrier, which has won four Best in Shows, isn’t included in the chart because the data on its popularity during the last century is incomplete. began to decline. Wire fox terrier14 Toy poodle2 One Yorkie did win Westminster, back in 1978. But Yorkshire terriers, small as they are, compete in the toy group at Westminster. The terrier on the rise is barely a terrier at all.Despite the upending of the import market decades ago and the breeds’ often sharply declining popularity, the terrier experts I spoke to were still high on the dogs’ chances to prevail at the Garden this year. Oddsmakers haven’t cooled completely on their chances, either. The Wynn sportsbook puts the odds of a Skye terrier Best in Show at 5-to-1, making that breed the second overall favorite. The odds of a German shepherd win are 4-to-1.7The Scottish terrier comes in at 18-to-1, the wire fox at 40-to-1, and the Welsh at 125-to-1. Charlie, the Skye terrier who was last year’s runner-up, has good odds to win this year, as does Rumor, who was the best of the German shepherds and won the herding group on Monday.At the Garden on Tuesday, the mood among the dog handlers will be serious and competitive. “It’s just like what you would expect with trainers at the Kentucky Derby or mechanics at the Daytona 500,” said Stewart, the beagle expert. “They’re not going to be talking to each other about the new clutch they put in their car.”But that competitive tension can work in a terrier’s favor. “The chaos that is [the Westminster] show doesn’t bother the terriers,” Orange said. “They are so outgoing and so full of themselves that they don’t get exhausted. And they don’t stress out the way some of the more sensitive breeds do. Very few things bother a terrier.”The royal terrier bloodline may have thinned, but it’s royal nonetheless. “Terriers are still difficult to beat if you’ve got a good one,” Green said. English springer spaniel6 Source: Westminster Kennel Club Sealyham terrier4 German shorthaired pointer2 Illustrations by Joe McKendry Airedale terrier4 For decades, it wasn’t just dog-show success injecting the terrier brand into the collective American psyche — politics and pop culture also shined light on these breeds. President Franklin D. Roosevelt had Fala, a Scottish terrier, as a pet in the White House. The dog was a centerpiece of a nationally broadcast speech given by the president in 1944, and a statue of the pet sits at Roosevelt’s memorial in Washington, D.C. The Kennedys owned a Welsh terrier called Charlie. Asta, a wire fox terrier and now a staple of crossword puzzle answers, became a Hollywood star, appearing in “The Thin Man” films and many other movies in the 1930s and ’40s. Alfred Hitchcock owned Sealyham terriers, and the dogs made cameos in his movies.But the history of terriers in America goes back further than that. To understand it, you have to start in the United Kingdom.Terriers were described by an English physician as early as the 16th century; by the Victorian era, the animals had become the people’s dog of choice. Flyckt-Pedersen and Peter Green, a legendary terrier handler who has won four Westminster Best in Shows, agreed that some combination of the animals’ hunting utility and the vagaries of public taste were responsible for terriers’ popularity in the U.K. Around the turn of the 20th century, “terriers were the popular things,” Green said. “The only other breeds that were popular were sporting dogs.” And different terrier breeds emerged that were tailored for different landscapes and different prey — rats, badgers, rabbits and so on. Most successful breeds at Westminster “God loves a terrier.” — Gerry and Cookie Fleck, “Best in Show”Nearly 3,000 dogs are entered this year in the Westminster Kennel Club’s annual dog show. Officially, they belong to 199 dog breeds and varieties, their names affirming the global success of dog breeding, one of the most awesome biological experiments in history: affenpinscher, Beauceron, boerboel, keeshond, löwchen, Plott, Samoyed, schipperke, vizsla, xoloitzcuintli.On Tuesday at Madison Square Garden, seven dogs will bound onto Westminster’s iconic green carpet in the event’s final round. Each dog will be linked to a human handler by a show collar and lead, the two participants expertly guided and guiding. When the applause finally dies down, a tuxedoed judge will carefully assess each dog for its appearance, gait, coat, ears, eyes, teeth and temperament — its form against its original function. After careful deliberation, the judge will deem one of these dogs the highest expression of what a dog can be. The award: A polished pewter bowl and the coveted title Best in Show.For a long time at the Westminster show — the club has put on dog shows since 1877 — the winner of this title came from the same group of dogs over and over and over again, resulting in a record that is unrivaled even by the most storied of sports dynasties. For decades, terriers reigned supreme over Westminster. But then the arc of history turned against them. Lakeland terrier2 Boxer4 Bulldog2 More: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS | Embed Pointer3 West Highland white terrier2 This fall from prominence has affected more than the multi-champion terrier breeds. The Dandie Dinmont, the Skye, the Kerry blue, the Bedlington, the Welsh, the standard Manchester, the Australian and the Lakeland have all seen significant declines in popularity, as well.For some terrier breeds, the situation is existential. In 2011, a campaign was launched to save the Sealyham terrier — winner of four Westminster Best in Shows and once the dog of choice of King George V, Cary Grant and Elizabeth Taylor — from extinction. “If we can save the rhino or tiger, we can surely save this useful and charming breed of dog,” the British magazine Country Life wrote. Some related breeds, like the English white terrier, from which the Sealyham line descends, have already gone extinct. In 2010, only 49 Sealyham puppies were registered with the U.K.’s Kennel Club, down from 2,000 in the breed’s peak years. The near-extinction of the Sealyham is an extreme illustration of terrier decline — even among terriers, the Sealyham is extremely difficult to show. The dogs have very thick coats, for one thing, and their white fur tends to get dirty easily.Despite the difficulties, an intrepid few still soldier on in the terrier world. Diane Orange, a columnist for the American Kennel Club, told me that she has bred terriers since 1956 and now breeds Welsh terriers in West Virginia. When I reached her by phone, she had her hands full: “I’ve got a 6-month-old puppy running around loose, and I’ve got to put her back in her crate.�� When she returned a minute or two later, she continued: “Right now, I’m starting to work on coats for four of them for the summer, and once I get really working on the coats, it’s going to take me an hour a day, per dog, to get them ready to show, for about three months.”When terriers were hegemons of Westminster in the early 20th century, there were far fewer breeds in the country. And as terrier popularity has declined, the variety of dog breeds recognized by the American Kennel Club and competing at Westminster has increased. But terrier titles haven’t gone down just because there is more competition now. In 1950, when terriers ended their run of winning 29 out of 43 Best in Shows, there were 19 terrier breeds recognized by the American Kennel Club, 17 percent of the 109 total. Now, there are 31 terrier breeds, 16 percent of the 189 total.6Westminster did not have historical data on the number of breeds and varieties competing each year, so I used the American Kennel Club data, which is a close proxy. There are 10 more dog types on the Westminster list, though, because the breeds are divided into even finer categories — e.g., the dachshund is one breed on the American Kennel Club list, but its longhaired, smooth, and wirehaired versions compete at Westminster separately. A new terrier breed — the American hairless — was recognized just this year and will make its debut at Westminster in 2017. It remains unclear what the next dog-show dynasty will be or if there will be one at all. Might it be the dawn of the toy? A Pekingese and an affenpinscher took the titles in 2012 and 2013. Perhaps a long-in-coming age of the hound? Hounds have taken three titles since 2008 — as many as they’d won in the previous century. Or maybe the retrievers will finally get their due.Things change. A Portuguese water dog now lives in the White House. Our celebrities tote around Maltese and toy poodles. “Frasier” went off the air long ago, and its star terrier, Moose, is dead. So is Uggie, the Jack Russell terrier from “The Artist.”But amid the still-smoldering ruins of the terrier empire, one terrier prospers — the rose that grew while the others wilted. The Yorkshire terrier’s increased popularity, per the American Kennel Club data, stands alone as a terrier on the rapid rise. By Oliver Roeder Pekingese4 In the past two decades, titles have been fairly evenly distributed across most of the breed groups. Last year’s winner was a beagle (a member of the hound group) known as Miss P, only the second beagle to take the title. The runner-up: Charlie, a Skye terrier. read more

Football Former Michigan recruits now key Buckeyes

OSU redshirt junior cornerback Gareon Conley picks off Michigan State’s quarterback Tyler O’Connor to seal the team’s 17-16 win at Spartan Stadium.. Credit: Alexa Mavrogianis | Photo EditorIt’s no secret that this coming Saturday’s game between No. 2 Ohio State and No. 3 Michigan has a lot of implications behind it. It is not just college football’s annual matchup between the two teams, but it is also a game that will potentially decide which of the two teams will make the College Football Playoff. But the rivalry goes beyond just “The Game” itself. It ranges all the way down to recruiting.For years, young football players have looked at both universities as potential options to continue their playing careers, while both programs have pushed to obtain the next best recruit. On the OSU roster, there is no shortage of connections with “That Team Up North,” as a few of its current players have decommitted from Michigan only to commit to OSU. This was the case for redshirt junior cornerback Gareon Conley and redshirt freshman running back Mike Weber.“I was a young-minded person, and really, (Michigan) was my first big offer,” Conley said. “But I wanted to explore my options, and when I came (to OSU) it just felt like going from the same program to a better program of what I already experienced, and it felt like home.”As a four-star prospect out of Massillon Washington High School in Ohio, Conley was a Michigan commit for eight months before he decided to join Urban Meyer’s 2013 class. Meyer said on Monday that he went to watch Conley play basketball when recruiting the cornerback, and that the team thought highly of him during the process.“I went and watched him actually practice basketball, and that’s when I was like, ‘this is a crazy athlete,’” Meyer said. “Then you get to meet him and his family. Major impact. He’s not just a great player, but a great leader as well.”Conley, who made the game-ending interception last Saturday against Michigan State, said that his initial commitment to be a Wolverine was “real fast.” He had only gone to Ann Arbor once to visit and didn’t talk to a lot of people, causing him to make the decision to switch schools.“It was a magnificent decision because, obviously, two years ago we won a championship and last year we had a good season,” Conley said. “Overall, the teams I’ve been a part of (at OSU) and the brotherhood I have experienced — it’s great.”Now one of the Ohio State team captains, Conley was the first player that Meyer would convert from Wolverine to Buckeye in his OSU coaching tenure. Conley wouldn’t be the last player to recommit to OSU, as Weber would do the same just two years later.Unlike Conley, Weber grew up in Michigan as a native of Detroit. After playing football for Cass Technical High School, Weber committed to the Wolverines. However, after Michigan fired then-head coach Brady Hoke, the four-star recruit decommitted from the university, and eventually ended up at Ohio State.Weber said that former Cass Tech teammate and current Ohio State teammate Damon Webb, a junior cornerback, helped him with his decision to join the Buckeyes.“Having people here that I know of, that I can talk to, and that relate to me is always good,” Weber said. “I used to talk to (Webb) in high school about the program, about what to expect, and he always gave me good feedback.”Weber said that with Webb already in Columbus and with redshirt freshman defensive tackle Joshua Alabi, also one of Weber’s Cass Tech teammates, committed to OSU, he was comfortable with his decision.“It feels good to play with guys you grew up with,” Weber said.However, Weber, who joins Maurice Clarett and Robert Smith as the only Ohio State freshman to rush for 1,000 yards, will be playing several of his high school teammates when the Buckeyes and Wolverines take the field on Saturday. “Now it is really personal. A lot of people I played with — Jourdan Lewis, Delano Hill, Mike Onwenu, Lavert Hill — all those guys I played with in high school and won championships with are on the team,” Weber said. “It’s going to be fun playing against all those guys and I’m looking forward to it.”Along with Conley, Weber, Alabi and Webb, true freshman offensive lineman Michael Jordan is also a native of Michigan and will be playing for his home-state rival on Saturday.With each of these players deciding to play for Meyer and the Buckeyes, there is no denying that both teams could look very different for Saturday’s game had Conley and Weber not recommitted to OSU and stayed at Michigan.Conley said that he is looking forward to the game on Saturday, and that he is happy with the decision he made three years ago.“It’s an honor to play in this game. It’s an honor to be a Buckeye in this game,” Conley said. “This is one of the most tradition-rich programs in tradition games, and it’s going to be a great challenge. I’m just glad to be here with my team.” read more

Ohio State baseball looking to continue winning ways against Penn State

After taking two out of three from Illinois in last weekend’s Big Ten series, the Ohio State baseball team is looking to keep the winning mindset alive with Penn State coming to town Friday night. OSU senior right-hander Brad Goldberg feels the season is still young and the team still has work to do, but is really starting to get that winning attitude back. “We’re still working,” said Goldberg. “We nearly gave ourselves some heart attacks coming back in both wins last weekend, but I definitely think we are getting that winning attitude.” Senior left-hander Brian King agreed with Goldberg, and said the team is gaining confidence and enjoying playing baseball together. “The confidence is huge right now everyone is working together and enjoying each other,” said King. “Honestly, we are just having a good time out there.” Ohio State is 25-13 overall this season and 9-6 in Big Ten play. The team is 9-4 at home this season, and is looking to continue that success this weekend. “Home field has been big all year,” said Goldberg. “We know the turf and especially now with finals it’s just nice to be at home and not have to worry about missing classes.” PSU sits last in the Big Ten with a record of 2-10 in conference play and 11-25 overall. As of late though, the Nittany Lions are heating up, and have won back-to-back games including a 7-4 win over La Salle Tuesday night. They also won their first Big Ten series last weekend after taking two of three from Iowa. A bright spot in Penn State’s lineup is sophomore catcher J.C. Coban, who is hitting .315 with two home runs and 21 RBIs in 32 games played. OSU coach Greg Beals said he is happy with the results from the previous two Big Ten weekend series, but hopes his team takes the right approach in the series against the Nittany Lions. “What I am looking for offensively is the approach,” said Beals. “It’s the mentality, it’s a competitive thing, and I want them to go up with a plan and execute it.” OSU is set to take the field against Penn State at 6:35 p.m. Friday at Bill Davis Stadium to start the weekend home series. read more

Ronaldo reveals the toughest defender he has ever faced

first_imgCristiano Ronaldo has revealed the name of the toughest defender he has ever faced in his career with his answer leaving many people surprisedOver the course of his glittering 16-year career at senior level, Ronaldo has played alongside and against some of the greatest players throughout the world of football.In terms of defenders, the Real Madrid star has come across the likes of Gerard Pique, Mats Hummels, Dani Alves and Carlos Puyol.Yet, despite now going up against the world’s most expensive defender in Virgil van Dijk in this Saturday’s Champions League final against Liverpool, it is somebody of a much smaller stature that has caused the Portuguese forward the most trouble.In an interview, after being asked a series of lifestyle and sport-related questions, Ronaldo was asked: “Who is the toughest defender you have played against?.”After a moment of careful consideration, the five-time Ballon d’Or winner replied: “Ashley Cole”.Franck Ribery, FiorentinaFiorentina owner: “Ribery played better than Ronaldo!” Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Fiorentina owner Rocco Commisso was left gushing over Franck Ribery’s performance against Juventus, which he rates above that of even Cristiano Ronaldo’s.¡IMPRESCINDIBLE! ??¿QUIÉN es MÁS GUAPO? ¿@Cristiano o Edu??? El TEST MÁS PERSONAL de @EduAguirre7 en #ElChiringuitoDeMega pic.twitter.com/2auNrgH1TM— El Chiringuito TV (@elchiringuitotv) May 24, 2018Ashley Cole was formerly a left-back for both Chelsea and Arsenal in the Premier League and was frequently pitted against Ronaldo during his Manchester United days, where they had a number of high profile battles.The former England international now plays alongside Zlatan Ibrahimovic at LA Galaxy, whom he also captains, in the MLS.last_img read more

Shin on South Korea defeat We became too subdued

first_imgSouth Korea boss Shin Tae-yong admitted that his players became far too “subdued” in their 1-0 defeat to Sweden in their World Cup opener and fears that the opposition goalkeeper “probably became bored”The Taegeuk Warriors were unable to test the Sweden defence in their opening game at the Nizhny Novgorod on Monday with Hwang Hee-chan coming closest to scoring when he headed wastefully wide in the closing moments of the match.A Kim Min-woo foul on Viktor Claesson in the box allowed Sweden captain Andreas Granqvist to score the match-winner.Speaking after the defeat, Shin was particularly critical of his attacking players.“I think…we became too subdued,” he said, as quoted by The Independent.Victor Lindelof, SwedenEuro 2020 qualifiers round up from group F George Patchias – September 6, 2019 Euro 2020 qualifying Group F saw Scandinavian neighbours Sweden and Norway keep the race for the groups second automatic qualifying spot alive.Spain had already…“We really wanted to win this game. That was the attitude of the players coming into the match.”Next up for South Korea is Mexico on Saturday, who arrive on the back of defeating reigning champions Germany 1-0.“Mexico against Germany were very fast and skilled. A very good, tough team,” said Shin of his next opponents.“They will be a formidable opponent. We’ll analyse the game against Germany and try to find a way to deal with the Mexico team.”last_img read more