People of Mostar celebrated the Victory of Croatia

first_imgNational team of Croatia last night defeated the best team of Spain with a result of 2:1 at the EURO in France, thus ending on the top of the Group D.Fans of Croatia celebrated the victory against the current champions of Europe until late night hours, and similar situation was in some parts of BiH. Hundreds of fans from Mostar went out to the streets with shirts, requisites and flags of Croatia to celebrate the victory.(Source: klix.ba/photo: hms.ba)last_img

Senate approves immigration bill

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORE11 theater productions to see in Southern California this week, Dec. 27-Jan. 2160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! WASHINGTON – Landmark legislation to secure U.S. borders and offer millions of illegal immigrants a share of the American dream cleared the Senate on Thursday, a rare election-year reach across party lines and a triumph for President George W. Bush. The 62-36 vote cleared the way for arduous summertime compromise talks with the House on its immigration measure focusing on border enforcement with no guarantee of success. Republicans and Democrats said energetic participation by Bush would be critical. “Why not say to those undocumented workers who are working the jobs that the rest of us refuse, come out from the shadows,” said Arizona Republican John McCain, a key architect of the bill. The legislation includes money to better secure the borders, provide a new guest-worker program and give an eventual shot at citizenship to many of the estimated 11 million to 12 million immigrants in the country illegally. The bill “strengthens our security and reflects our humanity,” said Edward M. Kennedy, D-Mass., McCain’s partner in the Senate compromise. “It is intended to keep out those who would harm us and welcome those who contribute to our country.” Majority Leader Bill Frist, R-Tenn., and the Democratic leader, Harry Reid of Nevada, both sided with supporters, a reflection of the bipartisan backing for a bill that was months in the drafting and survived several near-death experiences. In all, 38 Democrats, 23 Republicans and one independent voted for the bill, while 32 Republicans opposed and four Democrats opposed it. Conservative critics attacked the legislation to the end after trying unsuccessfully to pull it apart with amendments. “This bill will not secure our borders,” said Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., one of the most persistent critics. “This is amnesty,” added David Vitter, R-La., who tried last week to strip out provisions relating to citizenship. Not so, said Sen. Arlen Specter, R-Pa., chairman of the Judiciary Committee, in a rebuttal to weeks of debate. “They have to pay a fine. They have to undergo a criminal background check. They have to pay back taxes, they have to learn English and they have to go to the back of the line,” he said, referring to illegal immigrants who would apply for citizenship. Still, Sessions, Vitter, John Cornyn of Texas and others echoed a view widely held among House Republicans, many of whom have vigorously denounced the Senate bill as well as Bush’s call for a “comprehensive approach” to the issue. That portended difficult compromise talks in the shadow of midterm elections, at a time when Bush’s poll ratings are low, congressional Republicans are concerned and Democrats are optimistic about their chances in November. Lawmakers in both parties pledged strenuous efforts to reach a compromise. Specter said that Republicans, as the party in power in Congress and the White House, had a special burden to produce a compromise. “I believe the president will put a heavy shoulder to the wheel,” he added. Internal GOP divisions will complicate compromise talks. In the Senate alone, four members of the leadership voted against the bill, including Sen. Elizabeth Dole of North Carolina, chairman of the party’s senatorial committee. House Majority Leader John Boehner, R-Ohio, issued a statement that said, “we owe it to the American people to seek common ground on responsible solutions, while always stressing our most important priority is to secure our borders and stop illegal immigration.” The House bill, which passed on a largely party-line vote last year, is generally limited to border enforcement. It would make all illegal immigrants subject to felony charges and it contains no provision for either a new temporary worker program or citizenship for men, women and children in the country unlawfully. In contrast, the Senate bill would mark the most far-reaching changes in immigration law in decades.last_img read more