Colombian Security Forces Capture 79 Suspected Clan Úsuga Operatives

first_imgThe United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights reported in March that groups such as Clan Úsuga “are the main challenge to public security,” a threat greater than the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), the country’s largest guerrilla group. Meanwhile, the Colombian Armed Forces have become more aggressive in their pursuit of the organization. On April 18 in the department of Córdoba, law enforcement officers arrested seven suspects who allegedly were part of a network that trafficked cocaine into Central America, from where the drugs were routed to Mexico, the United States, and other destinations. Four of the suspects were allegedly leaders of the drug trafficking ring, and the United States has requested their extradition. The Coast Guard did not immediately report the names of the suspects; one is Colombian, one is Ecuadorean, and four are from Costa Rica. Neither did they immediately report the exact amount of the cocaine, though they placed it in the general range of 640 kilograms. Law enforcement agents also confiscated four pieces of radio equipment that could have been used to alert fellow narcotraffickers of the boat’s location so the cocaine could be transferred to another vessel. And three days later, security forces captured 72 more suspected members, also seizing an undisclosed number of weapons and computers that contained vital information about the organization’s criminal activities. Those arrests occurred during simultaneous raids in the departments of Antioquia, Atlántico, Chocó, Córdoba, Sucre, and Valle del Cauca. The arrests dealt a major blow to Clan Úsuga, said Defense Minister Juan Carlos Pinzón. And three days later, security forces captured 72 more suspected members, also seizing an undisclosed number of weapons and computers that contained vital information about the organization’s criminal activities. Those arrests occurred during simultaneous raids in the departments of Antioquia, Atlántico, Chocó, Córdoba, Sucre, and Valle del Cauca. The arrests dealt a major blow to Clan Úsuga, said Defense Minister Juan Carlos Pinzón. The Army and Navy are asking residents to use hotlines 146 and 147 to report any suspicious activity while they continue to combat violence and the trafficking of illicit goods nationwide. The Army and Navy are asking residents to use hotlines 146 and 147 to report any suspicious activity while they continue to combat violence and the trafficking of illicit goods nationwide. Costa Rican Coast Guard and National Police seize cocaine On April 18 in the department of Córdoba, law enforcement officers arrested seven suspects who allegedly were part of a network that trafficked cocaine into Central America, from where the drugs were routed to Mexico, the United States, and other destinations. Four of the suspects were allegedly leaders of the drug trafficking ring, and the United States has requested their extradition. The Coast Guard has been responsible for protecting the country’s waters since Costa Rica disbanded its Army in 1948. The Coast Guard did not immediately report the names of the suspects; one is Colombian, one is Ecuadorean, and four are from Costa Rica. Neither did they immediately report the exact amount of the cocaine, though they placed it in the general range of 640 kilograms. Law enforcement agents also confiscated four pieces of radio equipment that could have been used to alert fellow narcotraffickers of the boat’s location so the cocaine could be transferred to another vessel. Colombian security forces recently captured 79 alleged members of Clan Úsuga, one of the country’s most powerful narcotrafficking organizations, during numerous operations nationwide. The interdiction occurred about 30 nautical miles west of Cape Matapalo, where Coast Guard ships and aircraft spotted a suspicious vessel in a known narcotrafficking route. The Coast Guard surrounded the ship, preventing the crew from escaping, before Police and Coast Guard members boarded the vessel and found 32 bales each containing 20 kilograms of cocaine. The United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights reported in March that groups such as Clan Úsuga “are the main challenge to public security,” a threat greater than the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), the country’s largest guerrilla group. Meanwhile, the Colombian Armed Forces have become more aggressive in their pursuit of the organization. Colombian security forces recently captured 79 alleged members of Clan Úsuga, one of the country’s most powerful narcotrafficking organizations, during numerous operations nationwide. In March, President Juan Manuel Santos deployed a total of 1,200 Military Troops and National Police Officers along with around 20 Black Hawk helicopters the country’s northwestern region as part of Operation “Toma Masiva del Urabá.” The operation is utilizing Neptuno Task Force, which combines 12 existing task forces and is made up of members of the Colombian Army, Air Force, Navy, and National Police. Costa Rica’s Coast Guard and National Police recently teamed to capture six suspects in connection with the seizure of more than 600 kilograms of cocaine found aboard their ship in the South Pacific, Costa Rican Public Security Minister Gustavo Mata said. The interdiction occurred about 30 nautical miles west of Cape Matapalo, where Coast Guard ships and aircraft spotted a suspicious vessel in a known narcotrafficking route. The Coast Guard surrounded the ship, preventing the crew from escaping, before Police and Coast Guard members boarded the vessel and found 32 bales each containing 20 kilograms of cocaine. By Dialogo May 01, 2015 The Coast Guard has been responsible for protecting the country’s waters since Costa Rica disbanded its Army in 1948. Costa Rican Coast Guard and National Police seize cocaine Costa Rica’s Coast Guard and National Police recently teamed to capture six suspects in connection with the seizure of more than 600 kilograms of cocaine found aboard their ship in the South Pacific, Costa Rican Public Security Minister Gustavo Mata said. In March, President Juan Manuel Santos deployed a total of 1,200 Military Troops and National Police Officers along with around 20 Black Hawk helicopters the country’s northwestern region as part of Operation “Toma Masiva del Urabá.” The operation is utilizing Neptuno Task Force, which combines 12 existing task forces and is made up of members of the Colombian Army, Air Force, Navy, and National Police. last_img read more

Hewlett Man Killed in Hit-and-run

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A 65-year-old Hewlett man died after being struck in Hempstead by two vehicles, one of which fled the scene on Monday, Nassau County police said.John Santopolo was walking across Peninsula Boulevard at the corner of South Franklin Avenue when he was hit by an eastbound Honda Crossover that stopped at 6:20 p.m., police said. The victim was knocked into the roadway, where he was struck by the hit-and-run driver, police said.The victim was taken to a local hospital, where he was pronounced dead. The driver who stopped was treated for pain and passed sobriety tests, police said.There is no description available at this time for the vehicle that left the scene.Homicide Squad detectives ask anyone with information regarding this crash to call 1-800-244-TIPS. All callers will remain anonymouslast_img read more

WHO says Turkish cases may yield new findings on H5N1

first_imgJan 11, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – A World Health Organization (WHO) official says two Turkish brothers who have tested positive for H5N1 avian influenza were not sick, potentially offering scientists a rare opportunity to learn more about how the virus affects humans, according to news reports.The two boys had played with dead birds they found near their home in the town of Beypazari, prompting their anxious parents to have them tested for the virus, according to a Reuters report published today.”This is a very interesting case. They have still shown no symptoms of the virus and yet have tested positive,” Dr. Guenael Rodier, head of a WHO team in Turkey, told Reuters.”We hope to study this case carefully,” he added. “This is an opportunity to learn about the disease.”The two boys tested positive on Jan 8, according to Reuters. They are among 15 Turks who have tested positive in Turkish labs in little more than a week. Reports have not specified what kind of test was used in the boys’ cases.The WHO has officially recognized only four of the Turkish cases so far, following confirmation by reference laboratories outside Turkey. However, the agency has praised the quality of testing done by Turkey’s national influenza lab and has said that the other cases are likely to be confirmed by further tests.The two boys’ cases could help answer one of the pressing questions about H5N1: whether, or how often, it infects people without causing serious illness.Nearly all of the 147 human cases registered by the WHO since late 2003 have been severe, and 78 patients have died, a fatality rate of 53%. But some suspect that the confirmed cases may be heavily outnumbered by mild and asymptomatic cases that have gone undetected.So far, no one has published any large-scale blood-testing, or serologic, surveys to assess how many people in bird flu–affected areas carry antibodies to H5N1. If many people do, it would suggest they had infections that went undiagnosed.The two symptomless boys were being observed in Kecioren Hospital in Ankara, the Turkish capital, the International Herald Tribune reported yesterday. A Canadian Press (CP) report yesterday said doctors began treating the boys, aged 4 and 5, with oseltamivir (Tamiflu) as soon as they tested positive.Two other brothers from the Ankara area tested positive for H5N1 though they had only mild symptoms, according to the Herald Tribune. They too were under observation in an Ankara hospital. They had touched gloves that had been used to dispose of a dead duck.The atypical human cases are the not the only reason the Turkish situation offers a good opportunity to learn more about the H5N1 virus, according to news reports.The CP report said some of the Turkish cases were detected early, permitting doctors to assess how oseltamivir treatment affects the disease when started early. In addition, Turkish authorities have shown a willingness to cooperate with international scientists, the story said.”It is likely that the Turkish outbreaks will be more accessible to flu scientists than those cases in Vietnam and Thailand, where it’s been very difficult to penetrate,” virologist John Wood of Britain’s National Institute for Biological Standards and Control was quoted as saying.Rodier said Turkish scientists are already making plans for serologic studies, according to the CP report.Turkish Health Minister Recep Akdag today described the condition of all 13 surviving H5N1 patients as good, according to the Reuters report.last_img read more