Soil District Employee Pleads Guilty To Accepting Bribe

first_imgBy John BurtonFREEHOLD – An official responsible for soil conservation for property developments pleaded guilty Tuesday to accepting a bribe.John Tonon, a 51-year-old Manasquan resident and district official for the Freehold Soil Conservation District pleaded guilty in state Superior Court to official misconduct and bribery, according to the Monmouth County Prosecutor’s Office.Tonon had solicited a $700 bribe from a builder constructing a home in Hazlet, authorities said.The prosecutor’s office initiated an investigation after getting a tip and used an undercover officer to catch Tonon on tape accepting the $700, authorities said.Tonon was a resource conservationist for the Freehold Soil Conservation District. As a conservationist, Tonon would inspect construction sites for soil erosion, storm water run-off and sedimentation problems that can occur from land disturbances caused by building.During a walk-through at the Hazlet construction site, Tonon told the builder that the Freehold Soil Conserva­tion District inspections and subsequent reports could cost between $1,400 and $3,000. Tonon, the prosecutor’s said, offered to speed up the process and offered the needed approvals for the property in exchange for the $700 payoff.These approvals, authorities said, would allow the developer to obtain the needed certificate of occupancy for the property.Tonon met with a person he believed to be the builder’s partner, but was, in fact, an undercover detective, who recorded the conversations. Authorities said Tonon accepted the bribe, promising the quick issuance of soil approvals.Tonon is expected to appear in court again on Oct. 5. Under the terms of the negotiated plea agreement, the prosecutor will recommend that Tonon receive a five-year prison term in a state facility, with a two-year statutorily mandated period of parole ineligibility, authorities said.The Freehold Soil Conser­vation District, where Tonon worked, is responsible for inspections in Monmouth and Middlesex counties. It is one of 15 districts in the state, responsible for soil and water resources management and conservation.last_img read more

Training a Thoroughbred for Monmouth Park

first_imgArt Petrosemolo will follow Rainbow At Midnite when she returns to Monmouth Park in April and will be at the rail when she goes to the starting gate for her first race. By Art PetrosemoloVeteran New Jersey thoroughbred trainer John Mazza and owner Rosemarie Shockley are getting close to an answer for their $64,000 question.Exercise rider heading to the track for early morning workout at Gulfstream Park, Hallandale, Fla.After two years of careful handling, good food, vitamins, visits to the vet, romping in the paddock and Florida training, Mazza and Shockley soon will know if their group of Holly Crest thoroughbreds have what it takes to succeed in the sport of kings.Two-year-old gray filly Rainbow At Midnite and her six stablemates will relocate from Florida’s Circle S ranch to Monmouth Park soon for final race-ready preparations before their first start. Midnite’s sister Holy Rainbow, a three-year-old, has run well at Florida’s Gulfstream Park with two solid third-place finishes. It has pleased Mazza and Shockley and has given them hope for Midnite.Mazza, who has trained Vincent Annaralla’s horses at Holly Crest Farm in Locust, for years, says, “training is not an exact science. Everyone goes about it a little different. But with correct breeding, proper handling and good training, you could – if the horse has a competitive spirit – have a fast and successful thoroughbred.”Translated, fast and successful means capable of succeeding in allowance and even stakes races and not missing a paycheck! “If the horse just doesn’t have the speed or the heart to be a winner,” continues Mazza, “then you hope the genes are good so that he or she might pass it along to offspring.”Two year olds enjoy the Florida sun in the Circle S paddock.Thoroughbred training is a long and expensive process. Horses are foaled in the winter (hopefully January to March) and grow under the watchful eye of the broodmare and the farm staff. Food, care and surroundings all contribute to early growth as horses stay with their mothers for most of their first year. (Every thoroughbred ages one year on Jan. 1.)During its second year, the thoroughbred, now called a yearling, continues to grow and mature with other yearlings spending the warm months in grassy paddocks. As they turn two, trainers and owners decide when and if the yearling will be broke and readied for the track. There are special trainers and farms in the southern United States that specialize in getting these feisty fillies and colts to mature before the final exam at a racetrack a few months away.Third generation trainer Tim Kelly is preparing the Holly Crest hopefuls for racing this year at Circle S Ranch in Florida horse country about a half-hour from Gulf­stream Park. Kelly says when the two year olds arrive at the farm – usually in December – they spend the first month getting used to people and being touched and handled. “We brush them, talk to them, clean their feet and bathe them daily,” he says. “These horses have spent the first two years of their lives growing and playing with minimum human contact.”A pair of Holly Crest Farm two year olds work out on the soft track at Circle S Ranch.Kelly then begins to get each thoroughbred comfortable with the racing equipment including saddle cloth, saddle and bridle. “This is the first time these animals have had anything in their mouths,” he says, “and it isn’t natural.”It could be as long as eight weeks in the training program before a thoroughbred feels the weight of an exercise rider on its back and it doesn’t like it. Says Kelly, “Anything on a horse’s back is a predator and the horse will try to buck him off in self defense.” The phrase “breaking horses” comes from getting the horse to break the habit of resisting being ridden.The maturing but still feisty two year olds train six days a week and start by learning to walk, jog and gallop in a round pen, attached to a tether and then under the hands of the exercise rider. The thoroughbred then learns how to respond to the rider’s steering through the bridle by walking and jogging in figure eights and other patterns in a larger pen.But it isn’t all work, all day, says Mazza; two year olds spend the afternoons enjoying Florida weather grazing in large, shaded paddocks.Holy Rainbow in her morning workout at Gulfstream Park.Once the two year old is schooled, Kelly moves them to the training track. At Circle S, the oval is one-half mile with a starting chute and starting gate. “The surface is deep and soft,” says Mazza, “which allows the horses to develop bone and muscle.” The two year olds train un-shoed until their feet reach adult size in early spring and they may only have their front feet shoed to start.Horses work in groups. At Circle S, they are trained in pairs. “We have horses gallop in front of each other so the trailing horse gets used to sand in its face,” Kelly explains. They also gallop beside each other so they get used to running in close quarters and they change positions during each session, each day.Rainbow At Midnite gallops on the soft surface at Circle S Ranch getting ready for her debut at Monmouth Park later this spring.Mazza and Shockley make the trip to Circle S each week to watch the two year olds and confer with Kelly on their training. Mazza can tell when a “baby” (as he calls them) is progressing as expected. “You can tell the way they walk, jog, gallop and carry themselves,” he says.It’s all about bringing a horse along at the right pace, Mazza feels. “I am old school,” he smiles, “and I take the extra time to get the two year old ready. I only have one chance with each horse to do it right and I don’t want to rush it.” Mazza wants to see a two year old come back from a mile gallop unwinded and ready for more. When Holly Crest horses arrive at Monmouth Park in April, Mazza says he continues to bring them along slowly until he is sure they are ready for their first race.Trainer John Mazza watches a pair of Holly Crest two year olds exercise on the Circle S training track.Two year olds are not timed while in the breaking process. Trainers won’t have any idea of what speed these horses have and whether they might be better for short or long races until they “breeze” (gallop) 5/8 of a mile later this spring at their home track. It’s then that trainers will begin to get the answer to the $64K question on whether these young thoroughbreds have what it takes. The first final exam – a maiden race against other two year olds for a purse – comes soon after. And only then will Mazza and Shockley get their first real answer to whether they have a winner.last_img read more

Red Bank ‘Soupmeister’ Says Goodbye After 25 Years

first_imgRED BANK – Though specialty soup recipes are his passion, it’s the relationships Gary Sable will miss most when he hangs up his ladle and moves out of the narrow quarters he’s called home for the last 25 years. Sable said chicken pot pie has been his signature menu item. It was a painstaking process to crack the code and figure out the best way to make it. A resident of Keansburg, Sable plans to practice his craft from time to time at the soup kitchen at the Center for Community Renewal, next to St. Mark’s Episcopal Church, 247 Carr Ave., Keansburg. “But I say that with affection,” he added. “That’s the one people love most. And I came up with it the same way I did everything else. All of these soups come from experimentation at home on the family for Sunday dinner,” Sable said. “If they didn’t spit it out and everything turned out OK, then I’d bring it down here.” “Steve is a great guy who has been a customer from the very beginning,” Sable said. “He’s been in here working with me every morning for some time now, learning my recipes. I trust him with this. And I already told my wife I’m gonna be back here visiting. I’m gonna miss the customers. I’ve known so many of them for so long.” In his final week of operation, Sable said he rolled out his “greatest hits,” including chicken escarole, Italian wedding, chicken tortilla and the option he said helped cement his moniker, chicken pot pie soup. Over the years, if you strolled too briskly through the borough alleyway that connects the White Street parking lot to Monmouth Street, you could have easily missed the chalkboard listing of the day’s offerings at That Hot Dog Place. Customer Stan Montenaro, exiting the store recently with a cup of spicy sausage soup, described the 175-square-foot kitchen as a “claustrophobic hole-in-the-wall with a stove and a counter.” As they wait their turn in line for soup, sandwiches and hot dogs with sauerkraut, the lunch crowd banter is about new soup ideas, recently released rock n’ roll movies “Bohemian Rhapsody” and “Rocket Man,” and Sable’s two favorite teams, the New York Jets and New York Yankees. It’s more than chitchat, it’s a relationship developed over years and the thought of cutting these ties brought a tear to Sable’s eye.center_img Known as the “Soupmeister,” Sable has operated a Red Bank eatery named That Hot Dog Place since 1995, but recently sold the business to borough resident Steve DeAngelo. DeAngelo officially took the reins of the business Aug. 29 and will operate under a new name, Soul Sandwich. But Sable said most of the menu will remain intact. After pondering the recipe for weeks, Sable said he was losing sleep over how to perfect the crust. “You can’t have chicken pot pie without a good crust. How the hell am I gonna get a good crust on this soup?” Sable said. “So my wife, who doesn’t cook ver y much, she says, ‘Why don’t you make the crust on the side and serve it in a cup.’ Perfect! It’s like why didn’t you tell me this sooner? She goes, ‘You never asked me.’ That idea really helped make this place,” Sable said. “My wife is wondering why I want to come back and visit once or twice a month. And it’s because I’ve known some of these people for 25 years and honestly it’s going to be hard not to see them. That’s the toughest part of this whole situation,” Sable said. “When I think about it, there’s not one person who comes here that I don’t like. Before this, when I owned a bar, there were a hundred people I didn’t like. But here, not one.” When the shop officially rebrands as Soul Sandwich, Sable said he plans to retain his reputation as a maestro of the culinary mélange, but for a new clientele. But what has truly helped That Hot Dog Place sustain its clientele is the engaging personality of the Soupmeister himself. “Making soup is my passion and if I can use that to help out some of my community members then I’m happy to do it,” Sable said. “Besides that, I’ll have a full schedule of picking up my grandson from school and watching after him.”last_img read more

City Soccer Leagues idle until stretch run begins

first_imgLily Whites, Innkeepers, Club Inter and Jackson’s Hole are the top teams after the first half of the Nelson City Soccer League.Nelson City Soccer is currently taking a short break until resuming play in a few weeks.Lily Whites outlasted Red Dog and Dirty Dozen for the first half title in the Finley’s Ladies Rec League.The Whites edged Dirty Dozen 4-1 to complete the 12-game schedule with a 7-3-2 and a four-point advantage over Red Dog and Dirty Dozen, deadlocked for second spot.Selkirk Eyecare finished fourth. In the Leo’s Men’s Open League, Innkeepers made it look easy as the defending league champs cruised to a 9-1 record and a 13-point advantage over Kootenay Co-op.The L.V. Rogers Bombers finished third, two points in front of Old Dogs FC.Club Inter dropped only four points in the first half of the Jackson’s Hole Men’s Masters League.Club Inter finished with a 9-1-2 mark, good enough for a five-point advantage over defending playoff champ, Jackson’s Hole.Bia Boro is third followed by Red Dog, Ted Allen’s and Real Nelson.Jackson’s Hole lost only two games to dominate the Bogustown Co-ed standings over Bogustown.Jackson’s finished with a 7-2-1 record, eight points in front of Bogustown.Free Ride and Ted Allen’s finished tied for third.last_img read more

Nelson skaters look to sharpen routines in Rossland

first_imgSTAR 4 13&O – Courtney Shrieves, Morgan SaboSTAR 5 U13 – Charly DeFouwSTAR 5 13&O – Breanna TomilinInterpretive Events:Pre-Introductory Interpretive – Charly DeFouwIntroductory Interpretive – Morgan SaboBronze Interpretive – Breanna TomilinDance Solo Events:Jr. Bronze Dance Solo – Lila McKechnieSr. Bronze Dance Solo – Courtney ShrievesSr. Silver Dance Solo – Christina Champlin, Breanna TomilinElements Events:Elements 1 – Helena Keating, Isabella Kroker-Kimber, Morgan SaboElements 2 – Charly DeFouw, Breanna TomilinFor more info and photos visit nelsonfigureskatingclub.ca Free Skate Events:STAR 1 – Aurora Panko-Dool, Lulu Nyiti, Courtney DonaldsonSTAR 2-Tia Berens, Leo Measures, Lila McKechnie, Helena Keating, Hannah CorvenSTAR 3 – Isabella Kroker-Kimber A slate 14 of competitors the Nelson Figure Skating Club will test their mettle this weekend at the West Kootenay Invitational in Rossland.The meet marks the second major competition in the Kootenay Region giving skaters another opportunity to have their performances rated by a team of judges. In addition many skaters will be attempting to pass Dance and Elements Test.“Our senior skaters are looking to improve on their scores from the East Kootenay Invitational in Kimberley this past November,” said coach Sarah Gower.“They’re building towards hitting their peaks for the STARSkate Super Senior Series Final in Kelowna this March where provincial champions at all levels will be crowned.”For those skaters competing at STAR 4 and over their marks will also count towards qualifying for the Provincial Development Camp later this year.“The is the busiest time of the season,” adds coach Yoshie Measures.  “We have kids working on freeskate and interpretive programs as well as taking tests. For our younger skaters Rossland will be their first taste of what a competition is like.”last_img read more

Mallard’s Team of the Week – Nelson Toyota

first_imgNelson Toyota rans the table to capture the 2017 West Kootenay Men’s Basketball League Championship with a convincing win over Northport, Wash., in the final. Nelson Toyota, which defeated city rival Kootenay Lake Electric and Empire Coffee during preliminary playoff round action, scored early and often en route to dominating Northport 75-38.Mallard’s Source for sports would like to honour the lads with Team of the Week status.The team includes, Amos Tanguay, Brody Blair, Andre LaPlante, Derek Youngblutt, Adrian Ramos, Jeremy Phelan, Jon Ramos and Mike Vance.last_img read more