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Cardiff 0 – 1 Bristol C

first_imgBristol City took the Severnside derby spoils on Friday night, as they held on to beat Cardiff 1-0 at the Cardiff City Stadium.What proved to be the winning goal came inside 120 seconds of the first whistle, when Chris Martin tapped in Antoine Semenyo’s square ball to score his first league goal since joining the Robins from Derby in September – the visitor- Advertisement – – Advertisement – Neil Harris’ Bluebirds registered 17 shots throughout the encounter but failed to beat goalkeeper Daniel Bentley, meaning they stay 13th after a third defeat in four league games. Bristol City climb to second, two points behind leaders Reading.More to follow…What’s next?Both teams are next in action at 3pm on Saturday November 21, after the conclusion of next week’s international break. Cardiff travel to The Den to face Millwall, while Bristol City host Derby County at Ashton Gate.- Advertisement –last_img read more

GOP gerrymandering may grow even more extreme in the coming decade thanks to the Supreme Court

first_imgRepublicans have argued in several ongoing cases over uncounted absentee ballots that this clause only empowers the state legislature itself. That claim would exclude all those who hold the power to set or interpret laws under state constitutions, such as state courts, voters (via the ballot initiative process), or potentially even governors when they exercise their veto powers.The Supreme Court rejected this radical interpretation of the Elections Clause in a 5-4 ruling in 2015 that upheld the right of Arizona voters to strip their Republican-run legislature of the power to draw new maps through a 2000 ballot initiative that established an independent redistricting commission. However, two of the justices in the majority in that ruling, Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Anthony Kennedy, are no longer on the court and have since been replaced by justices much further to the right.Chief Justice John Roberts wrote an angry dissent in the Arizona case and was joined by Samuel Alito and Clarence Thomas, all of whom of course still serve on the court. Neil Gorsuch, meanwhile, has signaled that he would accept this unfounded legal theory in a pending case over late-counted mail ballots in Pennsylvania, and Brett Kavanaugh appears likely to join his nihilistic colleagues. Amy Coney Barrett hasn’t weighed in on the issue only because she didn’t have time to do so before Election Day.- Advertisement – If the Supreme Court does hold that only literal state legislatures may set federal election laws absent congressional intervention, independent redistricting commissions enacted by initiatives placed on the ballot by ordinary citizens could get struck down in Arizona, California, and Michigan. It would also eliminate the possibility of setting up independent commissions through future initiatives in states like Arkansas, Florida, Oklahoma, and more.The court could even go further and strip governors of their ability to veto new redistricting plans, if indeed only “legislatures”—free from gubernatorial involvement—can determine how elections are run. Such a move would disproportionately benefit Republicans, since it would bar many more Democratic governors in states with Republican-run legislatures (such as Louisiana, Michigan, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin) from blocking new gerrymanders than vice versa.Should this most extreme state of affairs come to pass, the only solution for Democrats would be to win control of more legislatures, but they’d be fighting on gerrymandered maps deliberately tilted against them.- Advertisement – – Advertisement – The Supreme Court isn’t the only threat, though, and it remains unclear just how much damage Donald Trump has done to corrupt the accuracy of the 2020 census. Let’s delve into each of these areas, including the options Democrats have left for fighting back.The court’s most wide-reaching impact could come if it upends a bedrock of two centuries of federalism by accepting an extreme and unprecedented view of the U.S. Constitution’s “Elections Clause.” That clause, found in Article I, Section IV, gives the “legislature” in each state the power to set the “times, places, and manner of holding” federal elections—though it adds that Congress “may at any time make or alter such regulations”—which is why, for instance, there’s a federal law from the 19th century setting a uniform date for congressional elections.- Advertisement – The second grim scenario, which is the likeliest to transpire, would largely impact gerrymandering in states Republicans already control. Specifically, the Supreme Court could eviscerate the rest of the Voting Rights Act (VRA) by invalidating Section Two of the VRA’s ban on laws that have a discriminatory effect on voters. Chief Justice John Roberts has in fact spent his four-decade career in Washington trying to do just that, and he now has five allies on the bench—and only four are needed.The court may gut Section Two either by finding it unconstitutional or by making its test for showing discriminatory impacts impossible to satisfy, the latter of which it could do in an Arizona voting case  it will hear next year. That would eliminate the requirement stretching back three decades that maps be drawn to create districts where voters belonging to racial and ethnic minorities, like Blacks and Latinos, can elect their chosen candidates. Republicans could gain perhaps as many as a dozen more congressional seats, concentrated largely in the South, and the impact on certain state legislatures would be even more dramatic.Lastly, the Supreme Court could make GOP gerrymandering worse by allowing Republicans to draw districts based solely on the eligible voter population instead of the total overall population, which has been the longstanding norm. Not only is the eligible voter pool whiter, it also excludes children, noncitizens, and potentially even some of the 5 million Americans disenfranchised due to felony convictions.Using the voter population would make Republican gerrymandering more potent in several key states such as Texas, where communities with large Latino populations that lean Democratic are typically much younger and have many more noncitizen immigrants than whiter communities with fewer children.Furthermore, people disenfranchised due to felony convictions are disproportionately Black and concentrated in Southern states such as Mississippi, which bans one in six Black citizens from voting for life, three times the rate of whites. A 2019 expose of leaked documents confirmed that Republicans have been plotting to bring this change about, and the Supreme Court did not eliminate the possibility in a 2016 ruling.However, one key wrinkle in this plan is that the Supreme Court refused to let Trump place a citizenship question on the census last year. Trump subsequently ordered the Census Bureau to use existing administrative records to match citizenship data from other sources with the granular type of census data needed for redistricting. However, Joe Biden could block the release of such data, and litigation over it appears likely.But even if citizenship data is unobtainable for redistricting, age data won’t be, and the full adult population is still whiter than the total population, especially in places like Texas. However, Trump has also tried to sabotage the accuracy of the census by rushing an incomplete count, the damage from which is yet unknown.Despite all this, Democrats and reformers still have a number of ways to fight back. The most important target right now is to win two Jan. 5 runoffs for the Senate in Georgia, which would split the chamber at 50 seats apiece. If, as looks likely, Joe Biden wins the presidency, Kamala Harris could break ties as vice president.Should that come to pass, Democrats could eliminate the filibuster and pass legislation in Congress to ban congressional gerrymandering by mandating independent commissions in every state. They could also reform the Supreme Court in a variety of different ways, including by adding more seats.Options also remain at the state level for as long as the Supreme Court’s hardliners back away from the ledge and don’t blow up the foundation of federalism. In a silver lining, voters in Arkansas, Florida, and North Dakota all rejected GOP-backed ballot measures this year that would have made future progressive ballot measures much harder, if not impossible. Arkansas and North Dakota, meanwhile, were poised to vote on redistricting reform measures in 2020 before GOP-dominated courts threw them off the ballot, so future efforts this decade could yet succeed.But this year’s elections have already brought dire news even if worst-case scenarios don’t come to pass. After a lost decade following 2010 in which Republicans repeatedly won control of key states such as Michigan, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin despite Democrats winning more votes, Republican minority rule is becoming self-entrenching in many states. 2020 was a key opportunity to level the redistricting playing field in many states and protect majority rule, but Republican wins have ended those hopes.Yet even if the Supreme Court does take this country down the darkest possible paths, all hope is not lost. Examples abound of countries bringing democracy back from the brink, including a recent one nearby.Last year, millions of citizens in Chile organized massive street protests amid widespread discontent triggered in part by a Supreme Court that kept thwarting the country’s left-of-center governments. These protests led to a peaceful revolution that culminated last month with Chileans voting to write a new constitution.Americans still have other avenues for redress, but whatever conclusions we draw from them, this week’s election showed that our country remains home to a majority that believes in democracy and wants to see the will of the people honored.last_img read more

Petzl IKO CORE Wearable Headlamp features a patented AIRFIT headband for comfort » Gadget Flow

first_img– Advertisement – If you need a solution for seeing in the dark, the Petzl IKO CORE Wearable Headlamp might be what you’re looking for. This gadget comes with a patented AIRFIT headband to offer an ergonomic and comfortable fit. Therefore, you can wear the IKO CORE for long periods, while you’re running at night, and working in dark conditions. The hydrophobic headband even resists sweat and rain. Furthermore, this headlamp features seven LEDs for even light distribution with different brightness modes: 6, 100, or 500 lumens. Depending on the brightness you choose, this wearable headlamp has a battery life of up to 100 hours. You can also choose from two beam types: flood or mixed. Overall, you can place this headlamp on your head, neck, helmet, or objects. This versatility makes it suitable or a range of tasks, so you can remain safe in the dark.last_img read more

Georgia Will Begin Recounting Votes, With Biden Still Favored

first_imgBut after that, the Trump campaign can still request an official recount, if the result is within half a percentage point. That means President Trump could effectively get three bites at the apple — or the peach, as it were — in Georgia. Still, with the margin in the first tally giving Joseph R. Biden Jr. an edge of more than 14,000 votes, election observers do not believe any number of counts will alter the outcome.Counties will begin their audits on Friday morning and are required to finish up by midnight on Nov. 18. Auditors from the counties’ elections divisions will sit at tables and count the ballots. Most of what will be reviewed will be straightforward: printed copies of in-person votes cast on electronic machines. But county officials will also review absentee ballots marked by hand. If they find ambiguities, the ballots will be referred to a three-person adjudication panel in each county made up of a Democratic representative, a Republican representative and a county official who will break ties.- Advertisement – – Advertisement – Georgia’s 159 counties were poised on Thursday to begin recounting nearly five million ballots in the presidential election, but confusion surrounded the proceedings even as county officials raced to get ready.A day after Brad Raffensperger, Georgia’s Republican secretary of state, described the process as a hand recount, his subordinates said Thursday that it was technically an audit and not a recount, though it would have largely the same effect. Counties are being told to audit every vote cast and tally a new result by midnight on Wednesday, two days before the state’s Nov. 20 deadline to certify its results.- Advertisement – – Advertisement –center_img The situation in Georgia grew more complicated on Thursday when Mr. Raffensperger went into quarantine after his wife tested positive for the coronavirus; as of Thursday afternoon she was planning to take a second test. Jordan Fuchs, a deputy secretary of state, said that Mr. Raffensperger and several of his senior staff members also planned to get tested on Thursday.The state’s use of an audit to re-tally all of the votes that were cast is unusual, though the secretary of state’s office believes it has the legal authority to do so. Audits are typically carried out for a portion of the vote to verify the results.“This will be the largest hand re-tallying by an audit in the history of the United States,” Gabriel Sterling, a top deputy in the secretary of state’s office, said at a news conference on Thursday. “We understand that. It is a heavy lift.” Critics questioned the move.“If they are saying that this is the audit, the law does not permit them to take audit results and make them official,” said Marilyn Marks, the director of the Coalition for Good Governance, a voting rights group. “Clearly, the secretary is responding to political pressures rather than following the intent of the law.” Paige Hill, a spokeswoman for the Biden campaign, said in a statement that “historically only races with exceptionally close margins have any likelihood of being overturned,” adding: “President-elect Biden’s margin is now at more than 14,000 votes. At the end of this hand recount process, we are confident the Election Day result will be reaffirmed: Georgians have selected Joe Biden as their next commander in chief.”Mr. Raffensperger’s office has come under considerable pressure. He initiated the audit after Mr. Trump’s campaign demanded a hand recount. Georgia’s two senators, Kelly Loeffler and David Perdue, who are both fellow Republicans, also called on Mr. Raffensperger to resign this week, under pressure from Mr. Trump. The president and his campaign are spreading misinformation and conspiracy theories about the election, falsely claiming that it was rigged.Mr. Sterling addressed some of the conspiracy theories on Thursday.“I know that there’s many other bits of misinformation out there, talking about flipping votes and changing votes,” he said. “Anybody claiming that things are being flipped by a super secret computer developed by the C.I.A. is just not speaking — is speaking nonsense.”He also said the news media had “mischaracterized the rationale behind” the audit “as caving to Trump and their campaign,” saying, “There’s nothing that could be further from the truth.”last_img read more

WHO says Turkish cases may yield new findings on H5N1

first_imgJan 11, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – A World Health Organization (WHO) official says two Turkish brothers who have tested positive for H5N1 avian influenza were not sick, potentially offering scientists a rare opportunity to learn more about how the virus affects humans, according to news reports.The two boys had played with dead birds they found near their home in the town of Beypazari, prompting their anxious parents to have them tested for the virus, according to a Reuters report published today.”This is a very interesting case. They have still shown no symptoms of the virus and yet have tested positive,” Dr. Guenael Rodier, head of a WHO team in Turkey, told Reuters.”We hope to study this case carefully,” he added. “This is an opportunity to learn about the disease.”The two boys tested positive on Jan 8, according to Reuters. They are among 15 Turks who have tested positive in Turkish labs in little more than a week. Reports have not specified what kind of test was used in the boys’ cases.The WHO has officially recognized only four of the Turkish cases so far, following confirmation by reference laboratories outside Turkey. However, the agency has praised the quality of testing done by Turkey’s national influenza lab and has said that the other cases are likely to be confirmed by further tests.The two boys’ cases could help answer one of the pressing questions about H5N1: whether, or how often, it infects people without causing serious illness.Nearly all of the 147 human cases registered by the WHO since late 2003 have been severe, and 78 patients have died, a fatality rate of 53%. But some suspect that the confirmed cases may be heavily outnumbered by mild and asymptomatic cases that have gone undetected.So far, no one has published any large-scale blood-testing, or serologic, surveys to assess how many people in bird flu–affected areas carry antibodies to H5N1. If many people do, it would suggest they had infections that went undiagnosed.The two symptomless boys were being observed in Kecioren Hospital in Ankara, the Turkish capital, the International Herald Tribune reported yesterday. A Canadian Press (CP) report yesterday said doctors began treating the boys, aged 4 and 5, with oseltamivir (Tamiflu) as soon as they tested positive.Two other brothers from the Ankara area tested positive for H5N1 though they had only mild symptoms, according to the Herald Tribune. They too were under observation in an Ankara hospital. They had touched gloves that had been used to dispose of a dead duck.The atypical human cases are the not the only reason the Turkish situation offers a good opportunity to learn more about the H5N1 virus, according to news reports.The CP report said some of the Turkish cases were detected early, permitting doctors to assess how oseltamivir treatment affects the disease when started early. In addition, Turkish authorities have shown a willingness to cooperate with international scientists, the story said.”It is likely that the Turkish outbreaks will be more accessible to flu scientists than those cases in Vietnam and Thailand, where it’s been very difficult to penetrate,” virologist John Wood of Britain’s National Institute for Biological Standards and Control was quoted as saying.Rodier said Turkish scientists are already making plans for serologic studies, according to the CP report.Turkish Health Minister Recep Akdag today described the condition of all 13 surviving H5N1 patients as good, according to the Reuters report.last_img read more

FDA may ban use of flu antivirals in poultry

first_imgMar 21, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – Veterinarians could not give poultry the same antiviral drugs being stockpiled the world over to battle a human influenza pandemic, under a rule proposed yesterday by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA).The FDA is proposing to ban the extralabel use of adamantanes and neuraminidase inhibitors in poultry. Adamantanes (amantadine and rimantadine) and neuraminidase inhibitors (oseltamivir and zanamivir) are approved for treating influenza in people. Under the proposal, the rule would take effect Jun 20.No drugs are approved to treat or prevent influenza in poultry, but the two classes of flu antivirals can be used legally for animals under the Animal Medicinal Drug Use Clarification Act of 1994, the FDA news release said. However, that law also allows FDA to prohibit certain extralabel uses in animals if they would pose a risk to human health.”FDA has considered all available information and has concluded that the extralabel use of anti-influenza adamantane and neuraminidase inhibitor drugs in chickens, turkeys, and ducks presents a risk to public health,” the FDA said. The agency added it could ban the use of those drugs in other animals as well.The FDA is not aware of such use of antivirals in the United States, the news release said. However, international organizations have raised concerns about such activities, because they could lead to emergence of resistant strains of flu. Chinese farmers reportedly used amantadine on poultry in 2005, raising concerns about human resistance.FDA is inviting comments on the proposed rule until May 22. (See news release link below for details on submitting comments.)Meanwhile, the World Health Organization (WHO) on Mar 17 released details about the current recommendations for using oseltamivir (Tamiflu) to treat people for avian influenza. The statement contains little new information, but it underscores how little is known about the use of oseltamivir in human H5N1 cases, even though neuraminidase inhibitors are considered the best defense short of a vaccine.”There is no direct clinical trial evidence that shows that oseltamivir is effective in human H5N1 disease because such studies have not yet been conducted,” the WHO said. “Without such trials, the optimal dose and duration of oseltamvir treatment is uncertain in H5N1 disease and therefore doses of oseltamivir used for seasonal human influenza continue to be recommended.”The agency said prospective studies are “needed urgently” to determine the optimal oseltamivir regimen for human H5N1 disease. Severely ill patients might benefit from a longer or higher-dose regimen than is currently recommended, but there is no clear evidence at this point, the statement said. The standard treatment regimen for adults is 75 milligrams twice a day for 5 days.The WHO also said studies are needed to better define the proper oseltamivir regimen for preventing H5N1 in people who have been exposed to the virus.See alsoFDA news release on the use of flu antivirals in poultryhttp://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/2006/ucm108620.htmWHO’s Mar 17 statement on use of oseltamivirJun 24, 2005, CIDRAP News story about China’s use of amantadinelast_img read more

Salmonella cases jump to 370 in 42 states

first_img CDC press release The peanut butter subject to the current recall was sold in more than 60 other countries on three other continents as well as islands in the Caribbean and the Pacific, the Associated Press reported yesterday. Feb 28, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – The number of people sickened in a nationwide Salmonella outbreak linked to peanut butter grew by 41, to a total of 370 in 42 states, since the last update a week ago, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announced yesterday. Jeff Farrar, chief of the state’s Food and Drug Branch, told legislators the involved farm is in the second year of a 3-year transition from conventional to organic farming and is no longer growing produce, the Herald reported FDA officials and ConAgra are investigating the peanut butter production process to determine how the produce may have become contaminated, the CDC said. See also: Local agricultural consultant John Inman told the Herald the location of the farm isn’t the central issue. “As an industry, we’re got to make sure this doesn’t happen again. That’s the issue as I see it,” he said. Tainted spinach traced to one fieldIn other food safety news, California officials said yesterday that they have traced last year’s spinach-linked Escherichia coli O157:H7 outbreak to a 50-acre plot in San Benito County, Calif., according to a report in the Monterey Herald. Past Salmonella episodes involving peanut butter include a 1996 Australian outbreak that sickened 15 people and a 1994-95 outbreak in Israel and Wales that was traced to contaminated peanut-butter–coated snacks and affected about 2,200 people, mostly children. Two closely related DNA fingerprints of S enterica serovar Tennessee have been associated with the outbreak, and the organism has been found in nine jars of peanut butter, the CDC said in a press release yesterday. The new information was revealed during a hearing before members of California’s Senate and Assembly agriculture committees, the Herald reported. FDA and state investigators had previously said that the E coli source had been traced to either Monterey County or San Benito County. S enterica typically causes fever and nonbloody diarrhea that resolves in a week. Of 294 patients for whom clinical information is available, 60 (20%) have been hospitalized, but no deaths have been reported. Illness onset dates, known for 256 patients, ranged from Aug. 1, 2006, to Feb. 16, according to the CDC. Sixty-two percent of the illnesses began after Dec 1. However, state officials declined to identify the specific farm, saying they would share that information when they release their final report with the FDA in coming weeks, the Herald said. Three high-profile E coli outbreaks in recent months were clearly or possibly linked to fresh produce. The outbreak traced to fresh spinach sickened more than 200 people in August and September, and lettuce was suspected in separate outbreaks linked to Taco Bell and Taco John’s restaurants later in the fall. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has advised consumers not to eat any Peter Pan peanut butter produced since May 2006 or any Great Value brand peanut butter with a product code on the lid that begins with 2111. Both products are made at the same ConAgra plant in Sylvester, Ga., and have been linked to the Salmonella enterica outbreak, which began in August, according to the CDC and FDA. The agencies announced the outbreak and voluntary product recall on Feb 14.last_img read more

Rand report proposes standards for mass antibiotic dispensing

first_img The standards are geared toward 72 cities that take part in the federal government’s Cities Readiness Initiative (CRI), a program launched by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in 2004 to prepare major cities and metropolitan areas to distribute antibiotics from the Strategic National Stockpile within 48 hours of a federal order to release them. Though federal law mandates that the standards be evidence-based, the Rand authors pointed out that the rarity of large-scale public health disasters means there is little evidence to base the standards on. Instead, the authors developed the standards by talking to practitioners, reviewing existing literatures, using mathematical modeling, and seeking feedback from an expert panel. Next stepsThe Rand authors suggest that HHS officials review the suggested standards, consider if changes are needed, then move forward to enact the standards. They also suggest that HHS consider whether the standards should apply to all locations that would receive antibiotics from the SNS, not just the 72 cities that participate in the CRI program. Oct 15, 2008 (CIDRAP News) – The Rand Corp., responding to a request from the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), recently unveiled a set of proposed standards for cities to use as they establish plans to distribute antibiotics to the public in the event of a bioterrorist attack or other public health emergency. The 133-page technical report, which appears on Rand’s Web site, covers four main topics: the number and location of points of dispensing (PODs), internal POD operations, staffing, and security. PODs are places where members of the public would go to receive antibiotics or other countermeasures in an emergency. See also: Internal operationsThe scale of the public health emergency will likely guide the selection of a dispensing protocol, and the report acknowledges the need for flexibility as cities make their operational plans. But the standards would require cities to establish and exercise at least one rapid-dispensing protocol that minimizes the need for licensed medical workers and gives instructions for directing recipients through the process, selecting the medication to dispense, releasing information about the medication, and dispensing the medication. The standards are designed to allow communities to be flexible and innovative in how they meet the 48-hour dispensing goal, the report says. “Moreover, the standards are intended to provide minimal requirements and should not discourage CRI sites from exceeding them,” it states. Instead of setting targets for numbers of PODs, the standards call for cities to estimate the number of people who would go to individual  PODs seeking antibiotics. Officials would then use a formula supplied in the report to determine how many PODs would be needed. Number and location of sitesThe authors recommend that the first planning step be to estimate the overall number of people who will likely come to PODs to pick up their medications, which will help them determine the number of PODs they will need. Estimating the number of people will likely depend on several factors that vary by location, such as tourism levels and the size of the urban workforce. Staffing provisionsThe authors predicted that recruiting adequate staffing for the PODs would probably be the most difficult aspect of conducting a mass dispensing operation and would present diverse challenges in different cities. “The standards development process revealed concern that uniform, one-size-fits-all staffing standards would fail to account for community differences, unnecessarily require jurisdictions to undo work already completed, and stifle innovation,” they wrote. Because rapid drug-dispensing actions are likely to push legal and liability boundaries, the standards require city officials to identify such conflicts and communicate them to those who have the authority to initiate legal changes. Another suggestion is that HHS establish an oversight committee to regularly review the standards in a way that engages stakeholders, seeks public input, and includes an appeal process. Security concernsThe standards would require cities to assess security at each POD, involve local law enforcement agencies in developing security plans, and provide for law enforcement presence at each site. In another nod to varying local needs, the authors give cities some leeway in the form of alternative standards regarding security staffing and formal law enforcement approval of security plans. For example, cities could use trained volunteers of private security firms if having sworn officers at every site were not feasible. “The standard assumes that individual jurisdictions are in the best position to define the scope of the population for whom they will be responsible for administering prophylaxis,” the Rand authors wrote. They also advised planners to factor in 12 hours for the CDC to get the drugs to warehouses and 12 hours to get the drugs to PODs. The Pandemic and All-Hazards Preparedness Act of 2006 requires HHS to develop performance standards for public health preparedness, and the HHS Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR) asked Rand to develop the proposed standards, according to the report. Public health officials will also need to recruit enough staff to operate the PODs and perform quarterly drills to keep in contact with them. The authors said the staffing requirement may be very large for some locations—as many as 6,000 in some metropolitan areas—so they offered an alternative standard under which officials would recruit and regularly contact only the core staff. Rand report on proposed antibiotic dispensing standardslast_img read more